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Mike KrauseMike KrauseOctober 17, 20186min589

Colorado voters will have a choice this fall between two transportation funding measures.  Proposition 109 focuses on road and bridge infrastructure, without a tax or fee increase, while Proposition 110 uses roads as a hook for a massive sales tax increase, a slush fund for cities and counties, and mystery transit projects mostly aimed at Metro Denver. 


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Miller HudsonMiller HudsonOctober 9, 20186min252

It has been apparent for more than a decade that Colorado needs to spend more money on its roads. If you have had the occasion to travel across our borders recently, it is apparent that even blood red states like Utah, Nebraska, Kansas and Wyoming have figured out how to finance this central responsibility of government. For the past half dozen years each new Legislature has identified transportation funding as its bi-partisan, number one priority without significant result. On this November’s ballot voters have an opportunity to choose between a pair of citizen initiatives that embrace the competing theories regarding this challenge that have consistently defeated resolution by our legislators.


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Marianne GoodlandMarianne GoodlandSeptember 5, 20187min499

While there's been plenty of angst about the amount of money going into the governor's race (currently at $21.3 million and counting, just for the candidates) campaign finance reports released Tuesday show that it's likely to be dwarfed by what the oil and gas is already pouring into committees that will do its bidding on ballot measures for November. The campaign finance reports come from the Secretary of State's campaign finance filing system, TRACER, and cover the period of July 28 through Aug. 29.


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Colorado PoliticsColorado PoliticsAugust 14, 20185min2781

Let’s fix our roads without a massive 21 percent increase of our state sales tax. The collaborative cronyists' proposal, "Let's Go Colorado" — a huge tax increase, allegedly for transportation — hurts everyday, hardworking Coloradans who are chasing their American dream.  If the politicians, bureaucrats, governmental appointees and interested parties behind the proposal, get their way, we’ll pay an additional 21 percent in state sales tax on basic items that make our lives better such as diapers, toilet paper and school supplies.