HudsonOpEdMug-e1519631443851-1280x1280.jpg

Miller HudsonMiller HudsonMarch 6, 20188min295

Weathering a seven-hour public hearing is a chore that usually falls to reporters and lobbyists who are compensated for their misery. Last week’s expulsion drama in the Colorado House of Representatives, however, packed the public gallery with young women wearing black (mostly interns and legislative aides), together with a smattering of the curious. A century has elapsed since the Legislature last considered ejecting one of its members. That 1915 debate involved a Representative charged with bribery, a subsequent perjury and concluded with his arrest on the floor of the House Chamber. A Democratic legislator and four other women, by contrast, alleged eleven instances of sexual harassment on the part of Steve Lebsock — charges judged credible by an independent investigator. House Democrats introduced their resolution to expel Lebsock from his seat, commandeering Republicans into a brawl with implications for three Senate colleagues facing similar charges.