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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirFebruary 23, 20186min58060
Conservative Momma — on her Facebook page. (Facebook.com)

She’s a onetime improv comedian and Screen Actors Guild member who tilted right, tuned into politics and turned on to Facebook, YouTube and Twitter to pitch her brand of political satire. Her sharp-edged comedy sketches had started to develop a following, and some of her videos went viral.

That’s when the Douglas County-based “Conservative Momma” says the social-media behemoths took notice — but, evidently, weren’t laughing. They didn’t shut her down, but she says they did slow her down. She recapped the details in a blog post on her website last week:

It was on Youtube that I first saw my videos being marked as “unsuitable” for advertisers. As a Conservative Mom, doing political Satire, I was unable to monetize my videos. I then saw Facebook not allow me to boost my posts or videos, which had allowed me to drive traffic to my website. Facebook also would not allow some videos to be shared at all. My Twitter following came to a complete stand still.

And she believes it was because of her politics and the funny, and effective, way she comes across in her videos. (Hot Sheet would have put in a pro-forma call to Facebook, Google’s YouTube and/or Twitter for a response — but, well, you know. Like we’d ever hear back. They’re busy ruling the world.)

Fed up with the apparent push-back from the invisible hand of Big Social Media, she announced in a post via all her platforms on Valentine’s Day that she was taking a break to regroup and ponder next steps. She makes clear she’s not gone for good.

“I’m going to come back, I have to come back,” she elaborated Thursday when reached for comment. “I’m just taking a breath and also trying figure out a way to channel more people to my site.”

(Despite her budding prominence, the 36-year-old political activist, consultant, wife and mom of three uses only her stage name on her media platforms — and asked Hot Sheet to do the same. She says it’s a safeguard against some heated and even menacing missives she has gotten from critics on the other side of the political divide.)

While her work is meant to be provocative, she never expected it to provoke a response from the major social media themselves.

Her breakthrough video was what she acknowledges was something of a “rant” on YouTube last fall about standing for the National Anthem. It started growing her fan base but also was a turning point in another way.

“After that, everything got weird,” she said. The aforementioned bells and whistles that make social media really sing — the sharing, the promoting — stopped working. As she wrote in her goodbye-for-now blog post:

My videos that once had Millions and Hundreds of Thousands of views, now seeing only a couple thousand. My voice and the voice of many others silenced. In order to make up for the inability to monetize and drive traffic to my site I started a Patreon and Paypal account to counter. Facebook then started a new algorithm, making it almost impossible for my videos to be seen at all. A little over a month ago,I started a Live show, hoping that perhaps Live video could not be suppressed, it has been. Now only about 4% of my page sees my videos.

…and this:

It has been a battle. At this point, I am taking a break from it all. I believe in Conservatism. I believe in getting the RIGHT people elected. I believe in changing people’s minds and hearts, and the Social Media Giants, have handicapped my ability to do so here. There has got to be another way, and returning to a grassroots game where I started in creatively consulting candidates might be a good start.

 

 


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningJanuary 8, 201817min48860

Minority Whip Steny Hoyer of Maryland, the No. 2 Democrat in House leadership, encouraged Democrat Levi Tillemann to end his primary campaign in Colorado’s 6th Congressional District during a December meeting at a Denver hotel, saying that state and national congressional and party leaders had decided “very early on” to consolidate their resources behind another Democrat, Jason Crow, to run against Republican incumbent Mike Coffman, according to detailed notes Tillemann wrote immediately after the meeting.