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Joey BunchJoey BunchOctober 16, 20173min597
Environment Colorado has a new 10-point plan to urge the state’s colleges and university to step on the gas toward getting 100 percent of their energy from renewable sources. Garrett Garner-Wells, director of Environment Colorado, said higher-learning institutions are poised to lead with more than 20 million students and a collective $15 billion in energy […]

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Tom RamstackTom RamstackOctober 13, 20175min656
WASHINGTON — Colorado U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton on Thursday called for more local input into federal decisions to designate public lands as national monuments. Tipton, R-Cortez, was responding to a bill approved by a congressional committee one day earlier that seeks to revise the Antiquities Act, which empowers the president to preserve federal lands. “Unfortunately, […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchAugust 18, 20175min268
Colorado lawmakers and environmentalists are anxiously awaiting a federal judge’s ruling on President Trump’s “one in, two out” policy on regulations. Public interest groups and a labor union sued the government to block enforcement of the policy, saying it overstepped Trump’s constitutional authority. Judge Randolph Moss’s comments during a hearing last week in U.S. District […]

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Peter MarcusPeter MarcusJuly 28, 20173min244
Colorado has seen a 730 percent increase in wind power production and a 10,000 percent increase in solar electricity since 2007, according to a new study. The report, “Renewables on the Rise: A Decade of Progress Toward a Clean Energy Future,” was released by the Environment Colorado Research and Policy Center, which has long advocated […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchJune 29, 20175min325
Environment Colorado
Garrett Garner-Wells, the director of Environment Colorado, meets with canvassers, from left, Nicholas Jansen, Dylan Robb, Mike Sickles, Tara Pelton and Ceiti Thomas.
(Photo courtesy of Environment Colorado.)

Environment Colorado is dropping $400,000 on staff this summer to knock on doors in all seven congressional districts, but the topic of their discussions isn’t next year’s election and who voters should choose. The Denver-based advocacy group wants to talk about Colorado Sens. Cory Gardner and Michael Bennet.

But mostly they’re pressuring Gardner, a Republican from Yuma, to oppose the Trump administration’s rollbacks on environmental regulations. Bennet is a Democrat, so of course he stands with Environment Colorado, at least close enough for politics.

But as far as consequences, Bennet doesn’t stand for election again until 2020, and Bennet, who was re-elected in November, has until 2022 before his next election.

“It’s really focused on the Senate, because the Senate is where we have the best chances of stopping some of these environmental rollbacks,” Garrett Garner-Wells,  Environment Colorado’s director, tells Colorado Politics.

The campaign aims to reach 60,000 Coloradans as part of a national effort  in 22 states and the District of Columbia, according to Environment Colorado.

Gardner’s office did not immediately respond to a request for a reply about the campaign, but I’ll update this blog at the top if they decide to weigh in. Coordinated liberal protests over a variety of Republican measures are a part of the office’s daily onslaught and geared to pick a fight.

Gardner has a mixed record on environmental issues from both sides. He’s a supporter of public lands, even pushing to relocate the Bureau of Land Management headquarters to Colorado, but has an 11 percent lifetime score with the League of Conservation Voters.

The Trump administration announced a repeal of the Waters of the United States rule this week, and Gardner said the regulation’s harmful impact on the state’s farmers, ranchers and small business owners couldn’t be overstated.

“Colorado’s agriculture community is already facing hardship and it is welcome news that this over burdensome regulation will never go into effect,” he said in a statement. “This decision was necessary to protect Colorado’s economy and put a stop to Washington’s unconstitutional takeover of our state’s rivers, streams and local waterways.”

Garner-Wells said the door-knocking started at the end of May and extends through August.

“Here in Colorado, our senators could not be more different,” he said in a statement. “While Sen. Bennet has voted consistently against rollbacks to environmental protections, Sen. Gardner has done the opposite. But it doesn’t have to be that way.”

Garner-Wells said special interests, the Trump administration and some congressional members see environmental safeguards as an expensive luxury.

“I’m confident our campaign will help galvanize the public, and make sure people’s voices are heard loud and clear.” he said. “Together, I know we’ll find the way to protect the environmental values we share and the places we love. Our families and our future depend on it.”



Joey BunchJoey BunchJanuary 12, 20173min306
When Conservation Colorado talks, Democrats, and a few Republicans, listen. The 22,000 members whose issue is the environment have a lot of clout in the statehouse, helping elect 54 of the 60 statehouse candidates it endorsed last year. Conservation Colorado spent $1.3 million on digital ads, mailers, paid canvasses and ads for TV and radio. […]

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