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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinMarch 21, 20175min820

Here's a whatever-happened-to update: If you remember Martha Ezzard from her time as a Colorado legislator, you should probably check out the story in the Denver Business Journal. A couple of decades ago, Ezzard and her husband, Dr. John Ezzard, moved to Georgia to run an Ezzard family farm. They turned it into a pretty successful winery and are now selling it and moving back to Colorado. Welcome back, Martha and John!


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Colorado PoliticsColorado PoliticsNovember 9, 201631min720

DENVER - Can you spell T-R-U-M-P? Good morning. Feeling the post-election night hangover? Us too. And we all know it's one hangover that takes zero adult beverages to produce. Pop an Aspirin, look in the mirror and smile or frown — take your pick — but recognize that the country has chosen a very different path for the next four years. But it appears you, Colorado, have chosen to keep things essentially the same. For the winners circle, victory is such a nice remedy for the hangover isn't it? Gov. John Hickenlooper can gaze into that mirror this a.m. and breathe a sigh of relief for the outlook of the remainder of his term. It's a bittersweet morning for Colorado's governor — a letdown that any presumed Washington opportunities are out the window, but certainly a reassurance that a likely divided Legislature in 2017-2018 will keep his popularity — and legacy — above the 50 percent mark. The Senate appears to be headed for continued GOP control, though only 84 percent of District 25 has reported so forgive us for reading the tea leaves a bit.


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Jeff HuntJeff HuntNovember 7, 20164min841

Proponents of Proposition 106, legalizing doctor-assisted suicide, claim the law has worked well in Oregon and other states. It’s simply not true. If proponents told the truth, Proposition 106 would go down in flames. Here’s the truth, legalizing doctor-assisted suicide opens the door for insurance companies and the government to get involved with everyone’s end-of-life decisions.


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Tom RamstackTom RamstackNovember 4, 201613min87

Popular opinion surveys show Colorado is likely to be propelled into an uncertain area of law next week when voters decide whether to allow doctor-assisted suicides for terminally ill persons. Sixty-five percent of Denver-area registered voters surveyed in a Ciruli Associates poll in September said they would vote for the legalized suicides. Twenty-five percent opposed it. If Proposition 106 wins approval, Colorado would become the fifth state to allow doctor-assisted suicide. Patients with less than six months to live could request lethal drugs from their doctors under the measure.