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Joey BunchJoey BunchJanuary 7, 20185min579
Colorado House Speaker Crisanta Duran, 37, is ending her House career at an age when many lawmakers are barely getting started. In the last two years, Duran’s national profile has risen dramatically, even before becoming the state’s first Latina speaker of the house. She won the Gabrielle Giffords Rising Star Award in March 2016 from […]

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Rachael WrightRachael WrightApril 13, 201711min321

Twenty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … When she was elected in 1994, Secretary of State Vikki Buckley became the first African-American woman to be elected in statewide office in Colorado. She spent 22 years working her way up through the ranks of the secretary of state’s office, and eventually became second in command of the elections division.


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightFebruary 16, 201711min343

… Twenty Years Ago This Week in The Colorado Statesman … An El Paso County Republican saga continued with self-proclaimed “true conservatives” toppling the “old guard,” seizing the reins of El Paso's Grand Old Party. After staking their campaigns on pro-life and Christian values, they went on to capture the top three party offices and 20 bonus member slots to the state GOP Central Committee. Many contended the social conservative sweep down south marked the end of the “big tent” era when party leadership preached tolerance for those with differing social views, particularly on the topic of abortion. The winners? Colorado Springs attorney Wayne Williams was elected chairman of the El Paso County Republican Party, Focus on the Family executive Tom Minnery won vice chairman and Leigh Ann Rauch was chosen secretary. All three were given a stamp of approval by a coalition of “true conservative” Republicans.


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightJanuary 19, 201712min300

… Twenty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … Coloradans were in a proud position. The state's very own were to head both of the nation's major political parties … Gov. Roy Romer acknowledged that his new post as general chairman of the Democratic National Committee — yes, while still governor — would make a 1998 run for U.S. Senate “less likely.” Romer admitted that it would be impossible “to wear three hats” — governor, DNC general chair, and U.S. Senate candidate, but also said he had not made a final decision whether to run or not. During a press conference to discuss his surprise ascension to the DNC post, the governor said that President Bill Clinton had called him the day before the legislative session began, asking him to resign the governorship.


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Clifford D. MayClifford D. MayAugust 11, 20169min333

Groucho Marx famously said he wouldn’t join any club that would have him as a member. Bernie Sanders last week turned that on its head, saying he wouldn’t remain a member of any party that wouldn’t have him as its leader. Sanders decided to become a Democrat only last year and only so he could seek the Democratic presidential nomination. He went on to wage an energetic and occasionally entertaining campaign. In the end, which came at the Democratic National Convention last week, he endorsed Hillary Clinton. The next day he told reporters he again considered himself an independent, not a Democrat.