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Marianne GoodlandOctober 12, 20179min177
The announcement this week from Scott Pruitt of the Environmental Protection Agency that he would rescind the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan is, not surprisingly, welcome news to Colorado’s coal industry, as well as to the communities the industry supports. But whether the end of the Clean Power Plan will actually change anything in Colorado […]

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David O. WilliamsDavid O. WilliamsSeptember 9, 201611min44

“Gail Schwartz, honestly, single-handedly helped in the decline … of the coal miners in the North Fork Valley, in my opinion,” said Rene Atchley, wife of a retired coal miner and mother of several children laid off from coal-mining jobs. “[Schwartz] claims to be a standup person, a fighter. All she has done is stand up and walk away from the people in her district after they asked her repeatedly to help us and she did not.” Schwartz has consistently defended her clean energy policies in the state Legislature, pointing to the need to shutter coal-fired power plants on the Front Range for air-quality reasons, the fact that the vast majority of the coal being burned for electricity in Colorado was coming from Wyoming, not the North Fork, and the overall global collapse of coal brought on by market forces such as the decrease in demand from China and the abundance of cheap natural gas.