Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival Archives - Colorado Politics
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Joey BunchJoey BunchDecember 7, 20173min1650

Metropolitan State University of Denver is putting on a roundtable Thursday for Colorado business and community leaders to talk about the economic benefit of immigrants covered by DACA.

The discussion is part of a broader national campaign to urge Congress to reinstate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, passed by President Obama to shielded people brought to this country as children from deportation.

President Trump signed an executive order ending the program, but activists, Democrats and even otherwise conservative business leaders are urging Congress to reinstate the so-called Dream Act.

The program allowed an estimated 690,000 immigrants brought to this country as children to receive two-year renewal work permits, including about 17,000 in Colorado.

The iMarch, as it’s called, is in Room 440A3 of the Student Success Building at Metro State on the Auraria Campus in Denver.

The iMarch for Immigration Campaign is a national day of local events in all 50 states, organizers said.

iMarch will highlight the voices of leaders in the business, agriculture, education, tech, and faith sectors, and the support of state and local elected officials.

The Denver speakers are slated to be:

  • Jeff Wasden, president of the Colorado Business Roundtable
  • Janine Davidson, president of Metro State University
  • Chad Vorthman, executive vice president of the Colorado Farm Bureau

The event is supported by the New American Economy, the Colorado Business Roundtable and Voto Latino.

Colorado Politics has told you about the work of the New American Economy before. The national coalition of more than 500 Republican, Democratic and independent mayors and business leaders is urging Congress to act on comprehensive immigration reform for the sake of the economy.

“Coalition members include mayors of more than 35 million people nationwide and business leaders of companies that generate more than $1.5 trillion and employ more than 4 million people across all sectors of the economy, from agriculture to aerospace, hospitality to high tech and media to manufacturing,” the organization said in a statement.

The Colorado Business Roundtable advocates for business-supportive legislation in the state and across the West, working with industries, chambers of commerce, educational institutions and government leaders.

“Our goal is to improve the business environment, increase effectiveness and expand the reach of our partners,” the organization states.


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Floyd CiruliFloyd CiruliOctober 11, 20174min3220

On Sept. 13, President Trump met with the minority leaders of their respective houses, Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer, over a meal of Chinese food. Reportedly, they agreed to a deal on DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which included more border security without building a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border. Though there were immediate disputes as to what was agreed to, the session offered some hope for a resolution to an immigration problem that has dogged the federal government for at least half a decade. More than 800,000 individuals are affected by a program started in the Obama administration in 2013 to protect mostly young illegal immigrants. DACA took form as it became clear that broader immigration reform was not possible.


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Kara MasonKara MasonSeptember 28, 20173min5520

Two cities in the Denver metro area are taking contrasting approaches to supporting the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program, which is set to end in six months if Congress doesn’t act on a permanent fix.

Aurora and Longmont were both presented with resolutions this week that asked council members to support the program that offers some protections to young immigrants that were illegally brought to the U.S. as children. But only one went through with a vote on the symbolic measures.

Monday night Aurora City Council had the chance to vote on a resolution that would have supported the continuation of DACA and U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman’s Bar Removal of Individuals Who Dream And Grow Our Economy Act, but instead decided to move it to the city’s Management and Finance Committee for “further development,” according to a report by the Aurora Sentinel.

Councilwoman Sally Mounier, who represents one of the most diverse wards of Aurora, said she wanted a resolution that encompassed immigration as a whole, not just DACA. But drafter of the resolution Councilman Charlie Richardson said that the measure was simple and asked whether those wanting to move the resolution were really supporting deportation efforts.

In a 6-3 vote, the resolution was moved to committee. Richardson alleged that it was a move made to sidestep an official stance on the issue for those who are up for re-election this November.

It’s unclear when that measure will be back before the full council.

On Tuesday, Longmont City Council took up a similar measure, passing it unanimously.

“We in Longmont have found DACA recipients to be important and well respected members of our community, and many Longmont businesses depend upon them as valued employees,” the resolution said.

The Longmont Times-Call reported there was no discussion on the resolution, but many community members showed up to support the measure.