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Josh LedermanJosh LedermanOctober 5, 20168min362

Republican Mike Pence won bipartisan plaudits for a calm and collected performance in the vice presidential debate. But Democrat Tim Kaine was claiming mission accomplished for forcing his opponent to confront —or not — Donald Trump's long list of provocative remarks. Pressed by Kaine to defend his running mate throughout the 90-minute debate Tuesday, Pence mostly dodged, sidestepped or let the moment pass by. He vouched for the billionaire's tax history, but was less vocal when challenged about Trump's temperament or his inflammatory words about women and President Barack Obama. "I can't imagine how Gov. Pence can defend the insult-driven, me-first style of Donald Trump," said Kaine, the Virginia senator and Hillary Clinton's No. 2.


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Julie PaceJulie PaceSeptember 24, 20168min304

Donald Trump needs to prove to voters that he has the policy depth and gravitas to serve as commander in chief. Hillary Clinton needs a moment to connect with Americans who question whether she can be trusted. In an election year that has upended political convention, the candidates' best opportunity to conquer their weaknesses will come in the most traditional of campaign forums: Monday's 90-minute, prime-time debate. Both campaigns expect a record-setting television audience for the high-stakes showdown, which could help tip the balance in a tight White House race.