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Nate BalisNate BalisMay 3, 20176min621

Disturbing conditions in Colorado’s youth corrections facilities were documented in the report Bound and Broken by the Child Safety Coalition. While the allegations and disagreements between the report’s authors and the state’s Department of Youth Corrections (DYC) might seem unbridgeable, there is a path forward for Colorado that starts with rethinking its approach to troubled young people.


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Clarice NavarroClarice NavarroApril 18, 20175min507

There is an opioid crisis in Colorado and across the nation. Colorado, and especially southern Colorado, has seen an increase in use and abuse of opioids. Traditionally, when we hear the word opioid we think of the “junkie,” but that’s not where it ends or begins. With the rise in use and abuse, we see a rise in crime and opioid-related deaths. The use and abuse can be attributed to many things including cost, over prescribing and especially mental illness. As with other drugs that are abused, there are all of the negatives that follow, and our communities are seeing it firsthand. Our law enforcement agencies are overwhelmed, our hospitals must cope and we see a rise in crime rates. All of which beg the question, "What is being done?"


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Sadie GurmanSadie GurmanDecember 28, 20164min279
In this June 29, 2006, file photo, John Ramsey hugs his son, Burke, facing camera, at the graves of his wife, Patsy, and daughter JonBenet, during services for his wife at the St. James Episcopal Cemetery in Marietta, Ga. Burke Ramsey is suing CBS and others for $750 million over a series that aired in September 2016 that Ramsey alleges concluded he killed his sister. (AP Photo/Ric Feld)
In this June 29, 2006, file photo, John Ramsey hugs his son, Burke, facing camera, at the graves of his wife, Patsy, and daughter JonBenet, during services for his wife at the St. James Episcopal Cemetery in Marietta, Ga. Burke Ramsey is suing CBS and others for $750 million over a series that aired in September 2016 that Ramsey alleges concluded he killed his sister. (AP Photo/Ric Feld)

The older brother of JonBenet Ramsey is suing CBS and others for $750 million, saying his reputation was ruined after a television series that concluded he killed his 6-year-old sister two decades ago.

In the lawsuit filed Wednesday, Burke Ramsey claims that the network, its production company and the experts interviewed in the series on the unsolved murder conspired to defame him for publicity and profit. The series, called “The Case of JonBenet Ramsey,” aired in September ahead of the 20th anniversary of JonBenet’s death.

The beauty pageant star was found dead in the basement of her family’s home in Boulder, Colorado, the day after Christmas in 1996. A prosecutor cleared her parents and brother in 2008 based on DNA evidence. But the district attorney currently overseeing the case has said it was premature to exonerate the Ramseys and ordered additional tests using new DNA testing technology that authorities hope will further the investigation.

Police have collected and studied thousands of pieces of evidence and say the case remains open.

CBS spokesman Dustin Smith declined to comment on the lawsuit, which is the second Burke Ramsey has filed over the television series.

In October, Ramsey, 29, sued a forensic pathologist featured on the show who said he bludgeoned his sister to death. The pathologist is also named in the latest lawsuit, which was filed in Michigan, where Burke Ramsey lives.

The new lawsuit says CBS and its featured experts set out to conduct a “sham reinvestigation” of the murder with “the preconceived the story line” that Ramsey killed his sister and conspired with his parents to cover it up.

“The accusation that Burke Ramsey killed his sister was based on a compilation of lies, half-truths, manufactured information, and the intentional omission and avoidance of truthful information about the murder of JonBenét Ramsey,” the lawsuit says.


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Clarice NavarroClarice NavarroDecember 14, 20165min475

I’d like to start off by saying how thankful I am to be able to serve the people of Southern Colorado for another term. This election was different in every aspect, and — as in every election — there are winners and losers. I feel the people of Colorado have spoken, and we have a great deal of work to do. Nationally, we saw that President-elect Donald Trump won the electoral vote while Hillary Clinton won the popular vote. The difference could be debated, and probably will be debated for years to come, but when I view the maps and overlays for popular versus electoral, the argument for how our president is chosen is clearly the right one. This is actually the fifth time in American history that this has occurred, and it is the second time in this century. Most will remember Bush v. Gore in the year 2000.