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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirMarch 30, 20182min556

…The Secretary of State’s Office’s Julia Sunny, writing for Lynn Bartels’s blog, offers a solid and helpful overview of the many candidates and issues facing voters on local ballots across this vast state of ours this coming Tuesday. From setting up local broadband service to allowing retail pot sales (state law allows local opt-in/opt-out), to taxes and term limits, local issues run the gamut.

Here’s a smattering of the ballot issues up for grabs:

… Firestone, Frisco, Lake City, Limon, Lyons and Severance will ask their voters for authorization to move forward in providing broadband. …

… Naturita voters will decide whether to allow marijuana sales, manufacturing, testing or cultivation, as well as whether to implement a marijuana sales tax and/or excise tax. Berthoud is asking their voters if municipally licensed medical marijuana dispensaries should be allowed to add retail sales. …

… Pagosa Springs voters will consider whether to impose term limits of two consecutive four-year terms, voters in Glendale will decide if their mayor and council members shall be limited to three consecutive four-year terms …

… Morrison and Palmer Lake voters will decide whether to move their regular town elections to November of even-numbered years. …

And of course there’s the usual bevy of tax issues, including a tobacco tax on the ballot in Basalt, a tax extension for the museum and street improvements in La Veta, the  extension of a tax for a family rec center in Cortez — the list goes on. And on.

That’s just scratching the surface; read Sunny’s full blog post for much more depth. Here’s the link again.


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Marianne GoodlandMarianne GoodlandMarch 13, 201817min1371

It was founded nearly 70 years ago, before the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, and has its roots in an early state anti-discrimination law that dates back to 1895. But now the state’s Civil Rights Commission is teetering on the brink of elimination — or potentially facing major changes to its mandate and authority — thanks in large part to the Lakewood baker who refused, on religious grounds, to provide a cake for a same-sex couple.