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Joey BunchJoey BunchMarch 8, 20183min895
The Colorado Senate gave a narrow passage to “constitutional carry” — carrying a concealed weapon without a permit — Thursday morning, one of the last gun bills filed so far this session. The Republican legislation likely faces the same outcome other gun bills have received in the Democratic -led House: certain defeat. Senate Bill 97 […]

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John TomasicJohn TomasicMarch 22, 20174min1303

The floor vote in the Senate on Tim Neville’s “constitutional carry” bill on Tuesday went as expected. His <a href="http://leg.colorado.gov/bills/sb17-116" target="_blank">Senate Bill 116</a> passed with full Republican support, but Democrats took turns voicing opposition. The immediate future of the bill is all but carved in stone. It will pass in the Republican-controlled Senate and fail in the Democratic-controlled House, the same fate as the constitutional carry bill Neville ran last year.



Joey BunchJoey BunchFebruary 16, 20173min903
A Republican-led state Senate committee gave a party-line nod to a bill that would allow Coloradans to legally tuck away a gun without getting a concealed carry permit. Keep the safety on your high hopes, gun-rights supporters. If Senate Bill 116 passes the Senate Finance Committee and ultimately weathers the 18-17 Republican majority on the floor, […]

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Kara MasonKara MasonFebruary 23, 20166min441

Monday was another gun-policy day at the Colorado Capitol. At the center of a second-reading back-and-forth in the state Senate, U.S. Senate candidate Tim Neville, R-Littleton, defended his proposal to lift the requirement that Coloradans who wish to carry concealed firearms apply for a permit and take training classes. “Coloradans shouldn’t have to go begging to the government to exercise their God-given unalienable Second Amendment right,” Neville argued. His bill passed the Senate Tuesday morning on a party-line 17-18 vote and now heads to the House where Democrats are sure to defeat it.