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Joey BunchJoey BunchJuly 22, 20173min93
Despite what the culture the media lead the public to believe, conservation starts with conservatives, and farmers and ranchers are our nation’s vital environmentalists. That was the message Saturday from former Colorado Congressman Bob Beauprez, the son of a dairy farmer and a rancher. He took the stage at the Western Conservative Summit Saturday as […]

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David LeinweberDavid LeinweberJune 29, 20174min930

As an angler, I appreciate Colorado’s lands for their pristine condition. They bring incredible moments of stunning silence, punctuated only by birds calling and the whisper of the wind blowing. Another day brings a spectacular view of the sun rising over snow-capped mountains. No matter what your attraction is to Colorado’s land, its beauty is appreciable universally.


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Paula NoonanPaula NoonanMay 31, 20175min1010

Both “sides” in the arguments over oil and gas development say the other is “taking advantage” of the explosions in Firestone and Mead. This should not be a time for sides. This should be a time for serious analysis. It can also provide an opening that should, for the sake of everyone in the state, cut through sides to allow common sense to function. Both accidents caused violent fire and explosions leading to death and serious injuries in non-industrial environments. The Mead accident occurred 1,000 feet from other buildings, according to reports. The Firestone explosion blew up a house as a pipe leaked gas that followed French drains into the Martinez’s basement.


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Bob WinklerBob WinklerApril 21, 20175min3822

It's important to remember that mineral extraction has never been safe or without risk but with extreme methods it's become even more risky. Running Weld counties economy on mineral resources that use and release toxins is an unavoidable part of extraction and requires a "sacrifice zone," which is labeled as less inhabitable by poisoning in the name of profits.


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John TomasicJohn TomasicApril 19, 201715min81

In Colorado, the rule is that oil and gas wells can be sited 1,000 feet from a school building. A bill that aimed to update that rule to measure the setback instead from the school property line drew crowds to the Capitol this month to testify in support of it and major drilling industry figures to argue against it. In the end, there were no surprises concerning its fate. Oil and gas drilling has long been a top partisan issue at the Legislature.


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Tom PyleTom PyleMarch 17, 20176min881

There’s an old and unfortunate truth about Washington, DC: “If you don’t have a seat at the table, you’re probably on the menu.” For the past eight years, the Obama administration’s “keep-it-in-the-ground” policies have kept the oil and gas industry “on the menu” and stymied responsible energy development and threatened to make energy more expensive for Colorado families.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinMarch 14, 201710min75

A controversial federal rule designed to provide clarity for protection of America's water resources, and now under a presidential order for change or elimination, could cause further confusion and take the rest of President Donald Trump's term in office to be resolved, according to two Colorado State University researchers and news reports. The order was strongly supported by Republican members of Colorado's Congressional delegation who had opposed the rule since it was proposed by the Obama administration and scheduled to take effect in August 2015. One member attached an amendment to a bill that would require more local government involvement when similar rules are considered.


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James AndersonJames AndersonJanuary 11, 20174min540

Citing backlash from Republicans, Colorado's Democratic governor said Tuesday he has abandoned the idea of issuing an executive order to seek a one-third cut in greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. But Gov. John Hickenlooper insisted he hadn't given up on the proposal's goals — or his own commitment to maintaining Colorado's status as a national leader in fighting air pollution.


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Tom RamstackTom RamstackJanuary 11, 20179min72

Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman is throwing her support behind the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as it defends itself in court against environmentalists opposed to oil and gas development projects. The environmentalists are pursuing a federal lawsuit to halt Bureau of Land Management oil and gas leases in Colorado, Wyoming and Utah. The oil companies plan to drill for oil and use hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, on 379,950 acres of public lands.