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Mike CoffmanMike CoffmanJuly 17, 20185min373

Innovations such as electricity, passenger cars and air travel have provided all of us with a better quality of life and millions of jobs.  The same is true for the Internet – unquestionably the most impactful innovation of the last 25 years.  However, while a solid legal structure of consumer protections was built around these other innovative technologies, we cannot yet say the same for the online world.  Although the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has made several attempts at establishing some basic ground rules, its actions to date have proven controversial and have not created the legal framework we need here in the U.S. to make the most of the internet.


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Jack TateJack TateJuly 11, 20184min829

Led by Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi, Democrats in Congress are holding the future of America’s high-speed internet hostage. In the process, they are testing the limits of the Congressional Review Act (CRA) in a blatant effort to reinstate burdensome, Obama-era regulations on the internet. Reinstating these overly prescriptive, public-utility style regulations would only serve to stifle innovation and slow the continued deployment of America’s broadband networks. This effort must be stopped.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinFebruary 20, 20177min296

One of Colorado's U.S. Senators is strongly opposed to a measure that would roll back an Obama administration rule to prevent the flaring and wasting of methane and natural gas developed on public and tribal lands, while the second is undecided. The rule was among several environmental regulations issued in the last days of the Obama administration. The U.S. House invoked the rarely used Congressional Review Act to reverse the rule. Colorado Republican U.S. Reps. Scott Tipton, Ken Buck, Doug Lamborn and Mike Coffman voted for House Joint Resolution 36 to repeal the rule on Feb. 3, while Democratic U.S. Reps. Diana DeGette, Ed Perlmutter and Jared Polis voted to keep the rule in place. The measure passed by a 221-191 tally. It had yet to have its first Senate committee hearing.


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Scott TiptonScott TiptonJanuary 16, 20173min439

A recent analysis by the Competitive Enterprise Institute showed that for every law Congress passed in 2016, the Obama administration issued 18 rules and regulations. With a total of 3,853 last year, the administration issued the most rules and regulations since 2005. When done right, rules and regulations play an important role in keeping our communities safe and secure. But over the past several years, we’ve seen a breakdown in the balance of power between our three branches of government that has led to harmful over-regulation. This is why we’ve worked in the House to set the stage for rolling back harmful over-regulation and restoring the balance of power between the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. We recently passed two bills that will accomplish these goals: the Midnight Rules Relief Act (H.R. 21) and the Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny, or REINS, Act (H.R. 26).