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Tracee BentleyTracee BentleyOctober 11, 20185min1161

Extreme to its very core, this measure – which would put 94 percent of private land  in the top five oil and natural gas producing counties off limits to new energy development — has drawn bipartisan opposition from all corners of the state. Opponents include both majority party candidates for Colorado governor, Democrat Jared Polis and Republican Walker Stapleton, as well as unions and chambers of commerce and rural and urban communities and their elected leaders.


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Stefka FanchiStefka FanchiOctober 10, 20186min451

Coloradans dodged a bullet earlier this year when the proponent of a crippling anti-growth initiative walked away from the measure for lack of public support. The statewide ballot proposal would have had wide-ranging and devastating consequences — not only for the housing sector, which effectively would have been shut down, but also for our entire economy. It would have backfired on us all, and especially on the economically most vulnerable.


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Tim BrownAugust 7, 20185min1686

A proposed ballot measure to increase setbacks five times the distance of what is currently required for oil and gas operations will cost Coloradans more than 100,000 jobs by 2030 and have a devastating impact on the economy, according to a new study and economic impact analysis conducted by the REMI Partnership and reviewed by Dr. Ian Lange and Dr. Braeton Smith with the Colorado School of Mines Mineral and Energy Economics Program.