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Ernest LuningErnest LuningJanuary 30, 201811min702

More than 150 politicos of all stripes packed the historic Carriage House at the Governor’s Residence at Boettcher Mansion in Denver Wednesday night for a session-opening shindig thrown by Colorado Politics. Republicans rubbed shoulders with Democrats, toasting the young political news website and the nearly 120-year-old publication it incorporated last year.


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Joey BunchJoey BunchAugust 10, 20173min745
Peter Marcus
Peter Marcus in the Colorado Politics office in happier times. (Photo by Joey Bunch/Colorado Politics)

There’s no easy way to say it, Colorado politicos. You won’t have Peter Marcus to kick around anymore.

Marcus is leaving journalism to become communications director for Terrapin Care Station cannabis company, a great opportunity for our ace, but a sad day for the Capitol.

“Peter was instrumental in launching Colorado Politics, where he served as our senior statehouse reporter and broke scores of political and legislative scoops for the new site,” said Vince Bzdek, editor of the Colorado Springs Gazette and Colorado Politics. “He helped formulate many of the ideas that Colorado Politics was built on, and more than anyone gave the site its drive-the-daily-conversation metabolism.”

He’s been an integral part of what Colorado Politics has become, the largest, most aggressive political news organization in the state. He’s the Butch Cassidy of our Wild Bunch. Crap, that’s the last time I can say that.

Before coming to Colorado Politics, Peter was the Denver correspondent for the Durango Herald, and before that he was a reporter for the Colorado Statesman, which has now merged with Colorado Politics. He has been at the state Capitol for 10 years.

At our hard launch of this website in January, I described Peter this way (that’s right, I’m quoting myself):

Peter, our senior statehouse reporter, is the son of a New York City cop. He’s the kind of gum-shoe journalist you don’t meet much anymore. Pete reliably stands up for what’s right over what’s flashy. Because of that, he breaks stories with the ease others use to pour coffee.

For the Durango Herald, he owned the unfolding Gold King Mine story in 2015. He convinced the governor to drink polluted water from the Animas River to prove it’s safe.

Peter will work with us through the end of August.

He will replaced, at least in position, by the most talented and experienced reporter we can find. Stay tuned.

“Our best wishes to Peter and eternal thanks for getting us off the ground,” Bzdek said.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirApril 20, 20178min295
While the annual “4/20” cannabis bacchanal gets underway this morning at Denver’s Civic Center Park — in search of some cause beyond satisfying the basic human need to party — a couple of observations from Colorado’s media gallery seem especially apt. First, Denverite’s Adrian Garcia notes today how a fissure has opened up in the marijuana world — pitting, for the […]

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Colorado PoliticsColorado PoliticsFebruary 5, 20161min511

 

The Colorado Statesman celebrated its 118th Anniversary Feb. 4, marking the occasion with the release of this film which was screened at a relaunch party hosted at the Governor’s Mansion Carriage House in Denver. The Colorado Statesman is the state’s longest running political news source, and one that has made numerous advancements in how we deliver important political and public policy news to you — quickly, effectively, accurately and conveniently. Our goal is to continue to provide you with our award-winning journalism for another 118 years. Long live The Colorado Statesman.

To become an exclusive member-subscriber to Colorado’s premier political news source, click here.


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Kelly SloanKelly SloanNovember 5, 20159min363
A legislative battle might be brewing over the scheduled renewal of the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District, slated for the ballot next November. The SCFD Board of Directors late last month approved a plan that will be introduced to the General Assembly in January, including a readjustment to the funding formula providing for a modest […]

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