08S4wwU2LHqnb7AY_.-e1533616529258.png

Daniel FischelDaniel FischelAugust 7, 20187min1755

The debate over fossil fuel divestment is nothing new in Colorado. Across college campuses in the state, activists have pushed for schools to rid their endowments of fossil fuels holdings, calls which both the University of Colorado and the University of Denver have resisted due to the steep financial costs it would impose. Now we are seeing the same debate play out in the political sphere, with demands for the state to divest its public pension fund, the Colorado Public Employees’ Retirement Association (PERA).


Lomax.jpg

Simon LomaxSimon LomaxMay 14, 201811min1430

What is the purpose of state government: To provide basic services to the public, or ever-increasing amounts of money to pension funds? That’s the question Colorado taxpayers will be asking today, tomorrow and long into the future after the passage of SB-200, a reform-and-bailout bill for the state’s public pension system. Passed just minutes before the end of this year’s legislative session, the bill aims to fix a $32 billion unfunded liability at the Public Employees’ Retirement Association (PERA), the state’s pension fund manager.


DougRobinson-1-W-e1526273674860.jpg

Doug RobinsonDoug RobinsonMay 14, 20183min540

The 2018 legislative session ended in a photo-finish on Wednesday night. At (literally) the eleventh hour, a number of critical bills made it through the statehouse, as lawmakers found hard-fought compromises to the session’s toughest issues. Fixes on transportation, PERA, and the Colorado Civil Rights Commission all came within the final 72 hours of the 120-day session.