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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirMay 11, 20186min453

Democrats and Republicans working together, conservationists and industry jointly testifying in support of legislation, and progress for the state of Colorado and its citizens. It’s hard to believe given the political discord that dominates our airwaves, but it actually happened. In fact, more than once. With what seems to be the media hot-button topic of late: oil and natural gas development.


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Colorado PoliticsColorado PoliticsMay 10, 20189min330

The recent opinion piece from Colorado teacher Jill Cullis shed some light on the problems facing Colorado’s schools. Recent increases in funding, with the bulk of those dollars not going to teachers' salaries, is the real problem. During Teacher Appreciation Week, we should highlight the fact that outstanding teachers are making the same salaries as mediocre or even underperforming teachers. In fact, based on outdated salary schedules used in most school districts, many underperforming teachers will make more than their “highly effective” counterparts.  This is an incredible disservice to Colorado educators and students.


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Kelly SloanKelly SloanApril 30, 20186min341

There is something to be said for a legislative process which, even in what many have categorically proclaimed to be the most bitterly rancorous, partisan year in living memory, still manages now and then to churn out legislation which tackles major issues and does so in a bi-partisan manner. One such effort is Senate Bill 18-003, sponsored by Senator Ray Scott and Representatives Chris Hansen and Jon Becker, which resuscitated the floundering Colorado Energy Office, and made it a better agency in the process.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirApril 27, 20186min487

Thanks to a decision on April 11 from state electricity regulators, Xcel Energy now has stronger energy efficiency goals that will save Coloradans roughly $165 million between 2019 and 2023 while also lowering pollution from coal and gas plants. The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) directed Xcel, Colorado’s largest electric utility, to raise their energy efficiency ambitions after hearing expert testimony from Sierra Club, Natural Resources Defense Council, the Colorado Renewable Energy Society, and the Colorado Energy Office.


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Joey BunchJoey BunchFebruary 26, 20183min1407

Here’s something you don’t hear often enough: Thank you, Ray Scott.

The rock-ribbed Republican senator from Grand Junction is a political slugger, but he’s found a soft side to get Democrats to the table on energy issues this session. He also is as strong an advocate for oil and gas, along with coal, as you apt to find in the General Assembly.

Last week, two Scott bills, both substantive, advanced with the strong support of Democrats.

Senate Bill 3 preserves the Colorado Energy Office and ensures it’s not overly focused on renewable sources. The legislation passed the Senate, 34-1, on Thursday — to the relief of most Democrats and environmental proponents hoping to keep the state’s hand, and dollars, in promoting renewable energy.

The only no vote in the upper chamber was Sen. Matt Jones, a Democrat from Louisville who leads the Senate Democrats’ efforts on clean air and renewable energy. He thinks the stay should keep its focus on energy sources for the future, and take position on fossil fuels effect on public health.

Scott said the landslide vote was the product of months of negotiations about what the office should be.

“Colorado is blessed to be an energy powerhouse among states, with a diversity of options available to us that other states can only envy, yet for too long our Energy Office was almost exclusively focused on a few technologies and ignoring all the others,” Scott said in a statement. “An all-of-the-above energy state needs and all-of-the-above energy office, which is what we’ll finally have if this bill continues to gain steam.”

The same day, the Senate Transportation Committee passed a bill, on a bipartisan vote, to toughen the state’s laws on contractors and excavators, working around energy and utility lines. Since the fatal explosion of a gas line in Firestone last year, Democrats have been calling for more regulations to safeguard the public from energy and utility lines, so this is bipartisan win on a partial solution, if it makes it into law.

The effort didn’t start with Firestone, however. Scott said he and Donovan had been working on it for 20 months with 58 stakeholders.

“This has been the most difficult and technical measure I have worked in my seven years in the building,” Scott stated.

The left can go back to hating him for his more conservative energy positions after this.


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Joey BunchJoey BunchJanuary 19, 20184min537
A bill to restore the funding and redistribute the attention of the Colorado Energy Office cleared its first committee Thursday. That’s not surprising for a Republican bill in a Republican-led committee, but the bipartisan 9-2 vote on Senate Bill 3 means it might have a chance to rescue an imperiled agency. Last year a partisan […]

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