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Walker StapletonWalker StapletonJune 7, 20186min857

Colorado’s roads and bridges have fallen into disrepair. The state’s growing population, history of underfunding transportation, and bureaucratic inefficiency have had real consequences for the condition of our infrastructure. As a result, Colorado has a $9 billion funding gap and maintenance backlog. These costs will only continue to grow the longer we neglect our transportation needs.


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Victor MitchellVictor MitchellJune 7, 20185min429

Colorado literally stands at a crossroads this year when it comes to transportation funding. I wish it was just a pun. Unfortunately, it’s the truth. As the November election approaches, special interests and Capitol insiders are demanding new revenue for transportation, by whatever means. The downtown Denver crowd is asking for a statewide sales tax increase for more transit, trails, and other goodies. A second, separate group opposes the sales tax, but wants to obligate Colorado to $5.2 billion dollars in additional debt and interest for selected road projects chosen by the big road builders and CDOT bureaucrats. I oppose both initiatives. My opponents embrace one or the other. We can and must address our road and bridge challenges without new taxes or debt.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirMay 3, 20187min796

In 2012 the Colorado Transportation Commission passed Policy Directive 1603, which directed the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) to “strongly consider managed lanes during the planning process for new capacity projects (any expansion and/or operational improvements) on state highways that are or will be congested.” In addition, the directive stated that CDOT must justify “the decision to not include managed lanes.”


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Joey BunchJoey BunchFebruary 26, 20184min141
Dozens of people met Saturday at Lewis-Palmer High School in Monument to tell the Tri-Lakers on how its going with Interstate 25’s lane expansion called simple “the gap.” Their trips north and back is a visible reminder of Colorado’s traffic problems, a double whammy of growth and neglect. The legislature hasn’t put much money into […]

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