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Adam McCoyAdam McCoyOctober 6, 20174min4810

A homeless advocacy coalition took it to the federal government and won. But, it may be more of a lesson in government accountability than David versus Goliath.

The Colorado Coalition for the Homeless won a court battle late last month after the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) finally declared a 59-acre Lakewood parcel near the Denver Federal Center suitable for use by the homeless.

The U.S. General Services Administration  — the government’s landlord — had planned to sell the land in an auction in July, but instead found itself in a federal court, which halted the auction, after the homeless coalition filed a formal objection. The coalition argued letting the sale proceed as planned effectively would sidestep a 1987 law that requires the agency to make the land available for serving the homeless.

HUD announced the site was suitable for homeless housing in a Sept. 25 letter, but is expected to formally label the land as such on Friday, according to the Lakewood Sentinel. Then the next step is for the coalition, or other homeless organizations, to formally declare to the Department of Health and Human Services their interest in the parcel and request the site be transferred to them.

“CCH intends to request that the site be transferred to CCH to provide a range of supportive housing, health, employment, and other supportive services for homeless families and individuals in Lakewood and throughout the Metro Denver area,” the coalition said in a press statement.

A July coalition press release labeled the proposed auction as riven with confusion, unanswered questions and possibly conflicting decisions by the federal agencies involved. HUD had initially declared the site “unsuitable for use to assist the homeless,” while GSA determined that it was more than suitable for high-end residential and commercial development, the coalition said.

“As homelessness and the lack of affordable housing are increasing significantly throughout Jefferson County and the metro Denver area, we believe that this site will help us make a dent in our commitment to reduce and end homelessness,” John Parvensky, CEO and President of CCH, said following the recent court judgement. “We look forward to working with local partners, government entities, elected officials, and the community to make sure we make the very best use of the site in our continued effort to provide lasting solutions for homeless and at-risk families.”

As of Sept. 28, there were seven bids on the land, with the highest offer reaching $6 million, the Lakewood Sentinel reports.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirAugust 10, 20175min530

Whatever the best use might be for some surplus land the government is hoping to auction off at the Federal Center in Lakewood, you’ve got to give due credit to the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless for its dogged pursuit of the 59-acre parcel. And it looks like the nonprofit might prevail in its quest.

As we previously noted here, the coalition dragged the U.S. General Services Administration  — the government’s landlord — to court last month in an effort to stop the sale. The coalition maintains letting the sale proceed as planned effectively would sidestep a 1987 law that requires the agency to make the land available for serving the homeless. A coalition press release at the time suggested the proposed auction had been riven by confusion, unanswered questions and possibly conflicting decisions by the federal agencies involved.  Coalition President John Parvensky was  quoted:

“It continues to confound us that (the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development) could have determined that the Federal Center Station property, located adjacent to the RTD station and St. Anthony’s Hospital, was ‘unsuitable for use to assist the homeless’, while GSA determined that it was more than suitable for high end residential and commercial development. …”

On July 28, a federal judge granted the coalition’s motion for a temporary restraining order halting the sale, finding, as the coalition recounted, “substantial likelihood of success on the merits” of proving that “HUD’s unsuitability determination was arbitrary and capricious and therefore in violation of the Administrative Procedures Act.”

This week, the judge issued a new order under which HUD will reopen and review its earlier determination of “unsuitability” of the property for use for homeless assistance. From the coalition’s latest press statement issued Wednesday:

… HUD has agreed to provide a new determination of suitability within 30 days of receiving information from GSA and (the coalition).  HUD will have until September 14, 2017, to reconsider its initial determination of unsuitability and issue a written notice of its decision to the (coalition) and GSA.

Within hours of the issuance of the new Order, GSA provided a letter to HUD and the Coalition identifying “information that could be pertinent to HUD’s reconsideration of its determination of unsuitability of the Federal Center site.”  CCH is reviewing this information and will provide its recommendation to HUD by August 15, 2017.

The coalition’s plans for the parcel?

If HUD determines that the property is suitable for use to assist the homeless, the coalition intends to request that the site be transferred to (the coalition) to provide a range of supportive housing, health, employment, and other supportive services for homeless families and individuals in Lakewood and throughout the Metro Denver area.

Is that preferable to high-end residential and commercial development? That call seems to have been made by Congress when it passed the 1987 law. In any event, the coalition’s effort to demand answers from the government, and to ensure the agencies in question are heeding the law, would seem to be a stride toward greater government accountability.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirJuly 28, 20173min670

It isn’t exactly politics per se, but the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless‘s ongoing joust with the federal government — over a parcel of surplus land in the Federal Center in Lakewood — raises questions about responsive government. Or, the lack thereof.

The news this week is that the U.S. General Services Administration is going to delay taking bids in an auction of the land in the face of a lawsuit by the coalition that alleges the sale would break the law. The coalition had sought an injunction against the sale earlier this week, contending a 1987 law “requires federal agencies to identify and make available surplus federal property, such as buildings and land, for use by states, local governments, and nonprofit agencies to assist homeless people.”

A follow-up press statement by the coalition Thursday, announcing the land sale’s delay, suggests the sale has been riven by confusion, unanswered questions and possibly conflicting decisions by federal agencies (like that would be a first):

“This is a great first step in stopping the sale of the property to commercial interests,” said John Parvensky, President and CEO of CCH.  “It continues to confound us that HUD could have determined that the Federal Center Station property, located adjacent to the RTD station and St. Anthony’s Hospital, was ‘unsuitable for use to assist the homeless’, while GSA determined that it was more than suitable for high end residential and commercial development.  We hope that this pause will give all parties the time to correct this potential injustice, and make this property available for development of supportive housing and services needed by a growing homeless population in Lakewood and throughout the Metro Denver Area”.

The Denver Business Journal’s Molly Armbrister meanwhile reports:

The GSA did not respond to a request for comment Thursday, but on Wednesday declined to comment, citing an ongoing investigation.

In other words, they have to figure out what’s going on before they can tell the rest of us.



Joey BunchJoey BunchApril 20, 20179min83
A Democratic-led House committee killed the latest version of Colorado’s “Right to Rest” bill to outlaw urban camping bans that keep homeless people from sleeping in parks and other public spaces. House Bill 1314 died on a 8-5 vote in the House Local Government Committee, marking the third year in a row the effort by Democratic […]

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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirApril 12, 20173min48
Under Colorado law, your landlord can give you the heave-ho with as little as seven days’ advance notice if you are renting month-to-month. And you can be blindsided at any time with a rent hike. That’s not much time to pack — or to hit up your folks for some extra cash to help you stay put. Things […]

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