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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirSeptember 28, 20172min4950

Ellen Golombek will be leaving her role as executive director of the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment at the end of October, the office of Gov. John Hickenlooper announced. The office issued a statement from Hickenlooper today crediting Golombek with having “transformed” the labor department since taking the helm in 2011. The statement said she will “pursue an opportunity with a national workforce advocacy agency.”

Hick praised Golombek at length:

“She brought together coalitions to advance workforce solutions, led regulatory reforms on behalf of business and created a culture of engagement and accountability within CDLE. She will be missed.”

According to the press release, Golombek implement a number of reforms during her tenure, including leading a 2012 effort to issue $625 million in unemployment compensation bonds so that the unemployment insurance trust fund would be solvent. That move turned off the solvency surcharge that had been assessed against Colorado businesses since 2004 and eliminated the interest payments on money borrowed from the federal government to pay unemployment benefits.

She has a long history in organized labor. She previously served 10 years as president of the Colorado AFL-CIO and before that worked with the Service Employees International Union. She was also National Political and Field Director for Planned Parenthood in Washington, D.C.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningJune 26, 20178min95

A group of liberal advocacy organizations for the first time released combined legislative scorecards this week, conglomerating assessments of the 100 Colorado lawmakers’ votes last session on key legislation the organizations said they plan to present to voters next year. A Republican who received among the lowest overall scores, however, dismissed the endeavor as a “political stunt” and told Colorado Politics he doubts the predictable rankings — Democrats good, Republicans bad — give voters any meaningful information.


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightJune 1, 20178min74

Thirty Years Ago this Week in the Colorado Statesman … State Rep. Faye Fleming, D-Th0rnton, switched her party affiliation from Democratic to Republican Feb. 14, 1987, only six weeks after she took office. One of her campaign contributors, United Steel Workers Local 8031, threatened to sue her for misrepresentation. The influential union also took to the streets contacting her constituents. A signature drive operation for Fleming’s recall had already been on the ground since March.


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Adam McCoyAdam McCoyMay 26, 20174min1011

A House bill that would allow employers to compensate workers with paid time off instead of wages for overtime is fielding conflicting opinions from Colorado lawmakers and labor leaders. On a party line vote earlier this month, the House passed the legislation, H.R. 1180, that would alter language in the Fair Labor Standards Act, allowing employees to opt for time off at a rate of time-and-a-half for every hour of overtime — the rate current law requires companies to pay workers for any work over 40 hours a week — instead of pay.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningFebruary 22, 201718min90

Three months after Democrats were stunned by the results of the presidential election — and just three weeks into the Trump administration — the party’s Denver County central committee turned out in record numbers for its biennial reorganization meeting. And if there was a common message, it was that the stakes were immense, and the party’s organizers, volunteers and officials were eager to get to work.



Unions are growing in Colorado, despite organized labor’s long, slow decline across most of the country. That should be good news for Democrats, who have a long alliance with unions, but last year Donald Trump further blurred the lines that divide billionaires and working-class voters. For organized labor to help Democrats in next year’s mid-term election, they […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchFebruary 2, 20173min86
Reports on the death of unions are greatly exaggerated, at least in Colorado. The Bureau of Labor Statistics report released last week shows union membership jumped from  8.4 percent of the workforce in 2015 to 9.8 percent last year. The Colorado AFL-CIO says that increase equates to about 44,000 more members. It cited: The International Brotherhood […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchJanuary 25, 20175min60
The state’s largest labor organization, the Colorado AFL-CIO, wants legislators to pass equal-pay laws, keep jobs from going overseas and fight Republican efforts to do away with the state health exchange. “Our hard-working families deserve a fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work,” executive director Sam Gilchrist said at a Capitol announcement. “They deserve […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchJanuary 25, 20174min82
It’s hard not to get hooked on these Senate Republican YouTube videos, and Tuesday’s group has another one you need to see. Tim and Patrick Neville, the father and son legislators, do some moderate to bad acting to make the Republican pitch on curbing regulations. “Look, Dad, you’re not the boss of me anymore, OK,” […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchJanuary 23, 20173min50
What does Colorado’s organized labor want in the first year of President Donald Trump? We’ll find out Tuesday at the Capitol. The Colorado AFL-CIO will talk about its legislative agenda in the West Foyer at 9:30 a.m. to “help Colorado increase economic prosperity and stop national attacks on the rights of working families.” Trump has exhibited […]

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