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Adam McCoyAdam McCoyJanuary 12, 20183min1142

Surging rent and an apartment glut have spawned a new Denver pilot program providing housing subsidies to low-income Denverites.

A news report from the Wall Street Journal notes that the new program called LIVE, Lower Income Voucher Equity, will help “house teachers, medical technicians and others” in “sparkling new, high-end rental apartments with amenities like gyms, roof decks and sometimes even pet spas.”

In lieu of letting vacant apartments sit empty, why not create housing opportunities for Denver residents, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock told the WSJ.

The city has long wrestled with affordable housing as the cost of living has soared, gentrifying many out of Denver neighborhoods. Denver has been working with developers to build new affordable housing units, often buying land to sell to developers interested in building affordable housing. Denver has also launched programs like the Temporary Rental and Utility Assistance Program aiding Denver households experiencing a housing crisis including a rent increase or loss of a job.

Under the new program, single Denverites making between $23,500 to $47,000 a year and families of four making $33,500 to $67,000 a year are eligible, according to Denver7. Those found to qualify would then receive a voucher to pay 30 to 35 percent of their income in rent for two years. The program would also place about 5 percent of monthly rent in a savings account.

The program currently has funding to subsidize 400 units, while 100 units have joined the pilot program thus far. LIVE, starting later this month, will be funded by the city, employers and charitable foundations, according to the WSJ. Denver anticipates spending roughly $500 a month subsidizing rent for a single person and $900 for a family.


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightJune 22, 20178min277

Twenty Years Ago This Week in The Colorado Statesman: Little old Colorado was plunged into the deep end of international politics when Denver hosted eight world leaders from the Group of Seven. Denver rolled out the carpet for national leaders from the USA, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Italy, Russia and the United Kingdom, and on the agenda for discussion were a host of heavy-weight issues including


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinMay 24, 20179min436

After nearly a decade, Denver Regional Transportation District’s University of Denver and Colorado light rail stations need to become more visible gateways to surrounding communities, rather than the "back doors" they now represent to their neighborhoods, according to a study of the two stations and their mobility possibilities. “It is time these stations transition from commuter stations to integrated mobility hubs and active local destinations,” reads an online City and County of Denver study description.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinMay 12, 20178min440

The first of Denver’s marijuana social consumption permit applications are expected this summer, after proposed rules and regulations called for under Denver’s Initiative 300 are adopted. Ashley Kilroy, executive director of the city’s Department of Excise & Licenses, discussed the main provisions of the ordinance establishing the four-year pilot program and the proposed timeline for implementation at a recent City Council Special Issues Committee meeting.