Cary Kennedy Archives - Page 2 of 10 - Colorado Politics
IMG_4278-1280x960.jpg

Jessica MachettaDecember 24, 20173min3690

Former state treasurer and Democratic candidate for governor Cary Kennedy held a 25-hour “tweetstorm” Thursday, one tweet per hour for every new person that moves into Colorado, 25 each day.

Also this week, Kennedy unveiled her goal of improving the state’s transportation challenges and expanding broadband in rural areas.

“Growth is a top concern,” Kennedy said on Twitter. “My #CKplanforgrowth tackles issues like housing, transportation & protecting the Colorado we love.”

“Colorado has gone too long without preparing for growth,” she said in a press release. “Our deteriorating roads and inadequate transit systems hold our state back and cost us time and money. Our state is innovative and forward looking, but we haven’t made the necessary investments. I know as a working mom how frustrating it is when you miss dinner with your family because you’re stuck in traffic. We can do better.”

Kennedy’s four-tiered plan includes making Colorado affordable; protecting public lands and open spaces; investing in transportation, housing, water conservation, clean renewable energy and broadband; and standing up for middle-class families.

“I’ve watched Colorado’s population double since I was a kid,” Kennedy told Colorado Politics. “And now, forecasters are telling us it’s going to double again by the time my teenagers are my age.”

The political reality, however, is that she will have to pay for such goals and possibly wrangle support from moderates and Republicans, depending on which party holds majorities in the state House and Senate next year. That dynamic quickly fills lofty campaign promises with hot air.

While serving as chief financial officer for Denver, Kennedy helped start the city’s first affordable housing initiative, a plan she would make statewide if elected.

“People can’t afford to live in the communities where they grew up, and can’t afford to live in the communities where they work, so that’s added to our traffic congestion problem,” she said.


Kennedy-at-HQ1.jpg

Jessica MachettaDecember 14, 20172min496
Gubernatorial candidate Cary Kennedy says strong Democratic governors need to lead change at the state level while Republicans in Washington continue to chip away at protections for the working class. Kennedy spoke to about 75 supporters at her campaign’s new headquarters in Denver Wednesday evening, saying her plan for preserving Colorado’s environment, public lands and […]

This content is only available to subscribers.

Login or Subscribe


Cary-Kennedy-Saurabh-Mangalik-2-W.jpg

Ernest LuningErnest LuningNovember 17, 201712min1270

Cary Kennedy loves this place. Over there is a field where she played high school sports, and there’s the cross-country course her daughter runs. She grew up nearby, attending Manual High School. Off in the distance, catching the sun, that’s the gold dome of the state Capitol, where she spent four years as state treasurer, and before that worked as policy director for the House Democrats.


Screen-Shot-2017-10-22-at-5.33.28-PM-1280x720.png

Joey BunchJoey BunchNovember 16, 20174min11320

Well, here’s a new idea courtesy of Colorado gubernatorial candidate Victor Mitchell: If you’re elected official and you’re running for higher office, get off the government payroll.

“You have to show up to your job to get paid, shouldn’t your elected officials have to do the same before asking for a promotion?” asks the 55-second ad called “Resign to Run”

Let’s see who the entrepreneur from Castle Rock might be talking about in the governor’s race: state Treasurer Walker Stapleton, state Attorney General Cynthia Coffman, Democratic Congressman Jared Polis, Lt. Gov. Donna Lynne, possibly Larimer County Commissioner Lew Gaiter, and the ex gubernatorial candidate turned attorney general hopeful George Brauchler … but not Cary Kennedy; she stepped down from her job as Denver’s chief financial officer last year, presumably to ready for the race. Mike Johnston was term-limited out of the state Senate last year, so he caught a break, and Greg Lopez hasn’t been the mayor of Parker since the early 1990s.

Of course, the flaw in this, unless Victor gets in other changes, would be that the governor, usually a Democrat, would be able to appoint the replacement attorney general and treasurer, offices usually won by Republicans in Colorado. That’s how Democrat Bernie Buescher became secretary of state in 2009, when Republican Mike Coffman was elected to Congress; Democratic Gov. Bill Ritter appointed him.

The bill is a work in progress, Mitchell’s campaign indicated Thursday.

“We are exploring details, but (as with term limits) we don’t think congressional candidates or federal officeholders could be under this, legally. But we’re exploring,” said David Hill, an adviser to Mitchell’s campaign who is a former Texas A&M professor who was director of the Public Policy Resources Laboratory and founding director of The Texas Poll.

“… There are a lot of moving parts here and we are exploring judiciously. But we believe the policy is sound. Several other states already have this, so the policy is not without precedent.”

He added, “This is how good policy is made. We advance a broad outline of a proposal and then get feedback, both from legal and political sources. Then we move to finalizing the proposal, based on the input received. That is how Victor Mitchell operates.”

Mitchell served one term in the state House before leaving to focus on the business for a few years.

He’s proposing a law to force those who have been elected to full-time state or local offices to resign before seeking a higher office.

“Taxpayers should not be forced to continue to pay the salaries of officeholders who are seeking promotion to a higher office,” Mitchell said in a statement. “Campaigning is almost a full-time job these days and we can’t expect an officeholder to run for a different office without neglecting their current office responsibilities.

“This law would not prevent anyone from seeking any office they choose. It would merely prevent neglect of duty and taxpayer subsidies of campaigners. I don’t like corporate welfare, and I don’t like welfare for politicians, either.”

Mitchell linked his proposal to term Limits, which he said cuts down career politicians, and the Colorado Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights “promoted financial accountability.

“Resign-To-Run will help keep the political insiders accountable to the people that elect them,” contends Mitchell. “Don’t expect the establishment to embrace this new idea, but I am already seeing that the people of Colorado believe it’s a welcome check on political ambition.”