ConstructionT.jpg

Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinDecember 8, 20165min458

A proposed growth limitation constitutional amendment to submit to Colorado voters in 2018 was found to not meet the state's single-subject requirement by the Secretary of State's title review board Wednesday, Dec. 7. The backer of the proposed ballot measure, Daniel Hayes of Golden, has seven days to file a motion for a rehearing and submit a revised measure to address the board's objection. That centered around Hayes' inclusion of a sentence that reads, "At least 30 percent of the housing subject to the limitation shall be affordable housing and affordable senior housing."



Colorado PoliticsColorado PoliticsDecember 2, 201615min454

DENVER —Since we are certain few of you are old enough to have seen the movie or understand the reference … We won’t say T.G.I.F! (says a curmudgeonly old person). Interesting week in political circles. Outside of eaaaarly speculation concerning the 2018 Colorado governor’s race, state lawmakers are drawing lines in how the state should tackle transportation, health care, education and, of course, how it will handle your hard-earned cash (you know the money it takes from you in taxes) with an upcoming projected budget shortfall (apparently your not sending them enough). Additionally, hanging over the Capitol dome are several possible legal challenges to recently passed propositions 107 and 108. And there's (always) more. So ... let’s get started!


Handshake-3-1024x504.jpg

Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinOctober 4, 201613min336

Getting endorsements from elected officials is not something either supporters or opponents of Amendment 70, which would raise Colorado's minimum wage, have been working to get, according to campaign organizers. Instead, both camps are 100 percent focused on gathering voters' support for their side of the ballot question. But that doesn't stop some elected officials from taking sides. With some reluctance, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock and Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper have announced support for Amendment 70 on the Nov. 8 general election ballot. But that doesn't stop some elected officials from taking sides. With some reluctance, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock and Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper have announced support for Amendment 70 on the Nov. 8 general election ballot.


13718658_909770772465884_1926610170564350263_n-e1470513177897.jpg

Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinAugust 6, 20167min344

Colorado voters will soon have a better idea if they will have to decide anywhere from a few to maybe more than a dozen ballot measures in the Nov. 4 general election. Dr. Robert Preuhs, an associate professor of political science at Metropolitan State University of Denver, said this year's ballot is shaping up to be “pretty typical” concerning amendments and issues. “Presidential election years tend to have more issues, but it's a little early just yet to figure out exactly what will be going on,” Preuhs said. “I'd say there is a potential to have quite a broad range of issues to decide.”