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Miller HudsonMiller HudsonJuly 13, 20186min410

Most of us experience confusion with the muddle of terminology surrounding affordable versus public housing. For the most part, public housing is a distinct subset within the affordable housing rubric. Nonetheless, a blurry line separates those whose economic circumstance requires public housing assistance from the fully employed who simply can’t locate housing they can afford. For nearly a century Colorado communities have acknowledged the necessity of providing a limited stock of publicly funded housing units for those with disabilities or poverty incomes. More recently school boards in our resort communities have found themselves financing housing units for teachers whose middle-class incomes fail to match market rentals. This is clearly a public housing demand of a different order.


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Hal BidlackHal BidlackApril 24, 20186min305

It’s all about the jobs, right? Economic development means more jobs for more people, and that’s how we grow our prosperity. Therefore, I was intrigued by a very interesting article here on Colorado Politics, authored by Mark Harden. Mr. Harden reported on the results of a survey of residents in the 20 cities selected by Amazon as finalists for their proposed second headquarters building (isn’t it interesting that a company can be so big that I don’t have to explain the single-word name? Amazon! Target! Cher?).


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Adam McCoyAdam McCoyApril 18, 20183min351

A marijuana tax hike would help boost affordable housing efforts in Denver under a proposal released Monday by Denver Mayor Michael Hancock.

The plan would double the city’s Affordable Housing Fund annually – from $15 million to $30 million – and generate an additional estimated $105 million in funding for affordable housing over the next five years. To finance the $105 million funding surge, the city and the Denver Housing Authority would issue bonds.

“This proposal will deploy more funding quicker to support our residents and families without increasing costs on the very households we are working to serve,” Hancock said in part in a statement.

The funding would aid the city in acquiring new land for affordable housing and subsidizing new low-income housing projects. Ultimately, Denver officials say the funding boost would double its creation and preservation of units — from 3,000 units to at least 6,400 units over five years.

“Each additional unit represents a new opportunity for a family in Denver, which is why we continually look for creative ways to increase funding for affordable housing,” Denver City Council President Albus Brooks said in a statement.

Created in fall 2016, Denver’s current affordable housing fund has promised an estimated $150 million be dedicated to affordable housing efforts, including development and preservation, over a decade. The fund currently operates on a mix of property tax revenue and a one-time fee on new development, according to the city.

Denver’s plan would in part pay for the plan through a proposed increase in the marijuana sales tax from 3.5 percent to 5.5 percent, which the city says would generate an estimated $8 million per year. The city would also allocate $7 million per year from the general fund.

The plan has won some early praise from housing advocates like Brad Segal with All In Denver, who told Denverite he was surprised by the city’s “ambition” with the proposal.


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Hal BidlackHal BidlackApril 13, 20187min277

One of the great good fortunes of my life was that I had the honor to be a friend of one of Colorado’s favorite sons, John Denver. I got to know John from the environmental side of things and ended up on the Board of Directors of his Windstar Foundation for a while. I loved his music when I first heard it in the 1970s and continue to love both it and John’s message and vision, to this day. I felt very grateful in 1985, when the Air Force decided I could teach at the Air Force Academy and thus come to Colorado to live. I moved here in 1987 and stayed on after my retirement from active duty, because, well, Colorado!


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Adam McCoyAdam McCoyApril 9, 20182min579

Denver celebrated the groundbreaking of a new 180-unit affordable housing project going up in the city’s Stapleton neighborhood late last week.

All of the project’s units — being constructed at 2820 N. Moline St. and coined the Moline Apartments — will be income-restricted for a 40-year period, the city said in a statement. Additionally, tax credits and voucher programs will help designate 40 of the units for very low-income residents, including homeless veterans and those with disabilities.

The project is part of the city’s ongoing campaign to combat the high cost of housing, which is squeezing some out of Denver neighborhoods. A recent survey pointed to affordable housing as the top issue on Denverites’ minds.

City officials say the $36 million development is among the first to receive funding for Denver’s Affordable Housing Fund. Created in fall 2016, Denver’s fund has promised an estimated $150 million will be dedicated to affordable housing efforts, including development and preservation, over a decade. The fund operates on a mix of property tax revenue and a one-time fee on new development. The city is reportedly exploring dedicating more funding to its affordable housing fund. 

Construction will start this month and is expected to wrap up in May 2019.