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Staff picks: The top 5 stories in Colorado Politics this week (July 16, 2017)

Author: Joey Bunch - July 17, 2017 - Updated: July 17, 2017

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The week Colorado saw the first financial reports for next year’s elections, while state Rep. Polly Lawrence, a Republican, announced her candidacy for state treasurer.

On the whole, these are the stories the Colorado Politics’ staff recommends you keep in mind in the days and weeks ahead.

 

DHS Reggie Bicha
Colorado Department of Human Services executive director Reggie Bicha discussed performance management on some of the state’s toughest issues with Colorado Politics. (Photo by Joey Bunch/Colorado Politics)

5. State’s social problems addressed with a war-room mentality

For five years the Colorado Department of Human Services has used C-Stat, a performance management approach hatched by leader Reggie Bicha, to take on some of the state’s toughest problems in caring for the most needy and vulnerable residents. Bureaucracies rarely run this well.

Read the full story here.

 

Education Secretary-designate Betsy DeVos arrives before testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, at a confirmation hearing. A Senate committee voted twice 12-11 on Tuesday, Jan. 31, to formawrd her nomination to the full Senate, despite allegations of plagarism against her. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Education Secretary-designate Betsy DeVos arrives before testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, at a confirmation hearing. A Senate committee voted twice 12-11 on Tuesday, Jan. 31, to formawrd her nomination to the full Senate, despite allegations of plagarism against her. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

4. DeVos is Denver-bound, and the resistances will be waiting

School choice-loving U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos will be in Denver for the annual meeting of the American Legislative Exchange Council. The gathering is Wednesday to Friday at the Hyatt Regency Denver, but it’s not clear when DeVos will speak. Protesters will be waiting to express their dislike of the Trump Cabinet member.

Read the full story here.

 

Nurse Angie Hagen and newborn at Denver Health, June 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
Nurse Angie Hagen and newborn at Denver Health, June 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

3. Insurers to Colorado: pay up and plenty

With turmoil over a Republican health care bill in Washington, leave it to health insurance industry to see an opportunity. Coloradans could pay 27 percent more on their premiums next year. “I take this instability factor as a real big deal in why we’re seeing the increases that we’re seeing,” state Insurance Commissioner Marguerite Salazar tells the Colorado Springs Gazette’s Jakob Rodgers.

Read the full story here.

 

People and activists of Greenpeace protest with a sign reading “Airtrump – free ticket – From: Paris – To: Hell” against the decision of the US government to exit the Paris climate deal in front of US Embassy in Bern, Switzerland, Friday, June 2, 2017. (Anthony Anex/Keystone via AP)

2. Trump is out, but Hick is in on global climate change pact

Gov. John Hickenlooper said this week that Colorado won’t be on the same page as President Trump when it comes to environmental policy. Hick said this week that Colorado would join the U.S. Climate Alliance, a coalition of 13 states and Puerto Rico, that are on board with the 2015 Paris climate accord that Trump pulled the U.S. out of last month.

Read the full story here.

 

"The best place for me to address these challenges is right here at home, right now," says U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter, an Arvada Democrat, announcing he's running for governor of Colorado on Sunday, April 9, 2017, at the Natural Grocers store in Golden. (Photo by Ernest Luning/The Colorado Statesman)
“The best place for me to address these challenges is right here at home, right now,” says U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter, an Arvada Democrat, announcing he’s running for governor of Colorado on Sunday, April 9, 2017, at the Natural Grocers store in Golden. (Photo by Ernest Luning/The Colorado Statesman)

1. The Perlmutter express pulls to a stop in governor’s race

Ed Perlmutter was a strong candidate on the Democratic side since announcing his plans to run in the next year’s race for governor. But the congressman from Arvada said this week he doesn’t have the fire down below to fuel another political run, including another term in Washington. That puts Perlmutter out of politics come 2019.

Read the full story here.

Joey Bunch

Joey Bunch

Joey Bunch is the senior political correspondent for Colorado Politics. He has a 31-year career in journalism, including the last 15 in Colorado. He was part of the Denver Post team that won the Pulitzer Prize in 2013 and is a two-time Pulitzer finalist. His resume includes covering high school sports, the environment, the casino industry and civil rights in the South, as well as a short stint at CNN.


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