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A progressive wave over Aurora’s City Council

Author: Adam McCoy - November 13, 2017 - Updated: November 13, 2017

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The Aurora City Council shifts to the left — but at least one seat is still up for grabs. (auroragov.org)

Aurora’s traditionally red City Council will have a blue hue after last week’s election.

Per preliminary election results, progressive candidates have won three seats on the Aurora City Council, altering the political makeup of a non-partisan board that is however typically a mainstay for conservatives. As the Aurora Sentinel reports:

In Ward I, upstart candidate Crystal Murillo leads incumbent Sally Mounier by approximately 400 votes. In Ward II, Nicole Johnston leads the pack with more than 2,600 votes. And in the At-Large race, Allison Hiltz will likely come out on top. She already has 15,000 votes.

The three women could start influencing city policy on public transportation, affordable housing, development, immigration and the environment (per the candidates’ campaign websites).

Murillo, who at 23 will be the youngest member of the council, says on her website her main priority will be affordable housing. She said she will “fight to make sure families can stay in their homes and implement policies that get renters on a path to homeownership.”

The daughter of Mexican immigrants, she will be featured an upcoming episode of She’s the Ticket, an online program following female candidates for public office around the country, according to Westword.

Progressives had their collective eye on Aurora city government early in the runup to the election.

The three candidates were coached by Emerge Colorado, a six-month program that trains Democratic women how to run election campaigns.

And, political clout from progressive groups like Colorado People’s Action  and Conservation Colorado, both of which promised to canvass voters on their behalf and provide other support, probably didn’t hurt.

The women also garnered the endorsement of the hometown newspaper, the Aurora Sentinel, in an October editorial.

The board will still however retain many conservative voices. One of which, as the Sentinel noted, will likely be conservative incumbent Marsha Berzins, who appears poised to retain her Ward III seat on the council.

Adam McCoy

Adam McCoy

Adam McCoy covers Denver-area politics for Colorado Politics.


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