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Progressive ‘Run for Something’ organization unveils initial list of Colorado endorsements

Author: Ernest Luning - August 18, 2017 - Updated: August 18, 2017

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The national Run for Something organization says it plans to encourage and help progressive candidates under age 35 run for office. It's endorsed a number of Colorado candidates, including school board and legislative hopefuls. (Logo via Run for Something)The national Run for Something organization says it plans to encourage and help progressive candidates under age 35 run for office. It’s endorsed a number of Colorado candidates, including school board and legislative hopefuls. (Logo via Run for Something)

The progressive Run for Something organization announced this week it’s backing several Colorado candidates for municipal office, school boards and legislative seats.

The national group, which aims to recruit and support “talented, passionate young people” — up to age 35 —  “who will advocate for progressive values” is getting behind dozens of Democratic candidates in 18 states in its initial round of endorsements, part of what organizers call an effort to build a bench in down-ballot races the traditional party apparatus often ignores.

“Our candidates look like the country we’re trying to represent and the base of the party we’re trying to rebuild,” the group says.

Colorado candidates receiving the group’s nod include Lakewood City Council candidate Kyra deGruy, Denver School Board candidate Tay Anderson and Thornton City Council candidate Suzie Brundage, all on the ballot this fall in nonpartisan races; and state House candidates Dylan Roberts and Rochelle Galindo, both Democrats.

Roberts, an Eagle County prosecutor, is running for the House District 26 seat represented by Democratic congressional candidate Diane Mitsch Bush, and Galinodo, a member of the Greeley City Council, is seeking the House District 50 seat represented by term-limited Democrat Dave Young.

The organization, founded by the woman who ran Hillary Clinton’s email program (“the other emails,” she notes) and a veteran political and management consultant, puts its prospects through a rigorous application and interview process. Those who win endorsements are first- or second-time candidates who check off a number of progressive positions, such as advocating for criminal justice reform and supporting immigration reform, voting rights and organized labor. (The list of positions isn’t set in stone, however, because organizers say they’re taking regional differences into account: “A Democrat in Louisiana, for example, can’t emphasize the same thing as a Democrat in California.”)

At last count, organizers said, nearly 11,000 people have signed up with the group to say they’re interested in running for office.

An endorsement means the organization plan to connect candidates with existing progressive campaign recruitment and training groups, such as EMILY’s List, Wellstone and Emerge. For some candidates, backing will also include fundraising and staff, organizers say.

Ernest Luning

Ernest Luning

Ernest Luning is a political correspondent for Colorado Politics. He has covered politics and government for newspapers and online news sites in Colorado for more than 25 years, including at the Highlands Ranch Herald, the Jefferson Sentinels chain of community newspapers and the Aurora Sentinel, where he was the city hall and cops reporter. After editing the Aurora Daily Sun, he was a political reporter and blogger for The Colorado Independent site. Since 2009, he has been the senior political reporter and occasional editor for The Colorado Statesman.


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