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Hickenlooper has electric cars and Commerce City on Wednesday calendar

Author: Joey Bunch - October 4, 2017 - Updated: October 4, 2017

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Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper speaks at the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee during a hearing to discuses ways to stabilize health insurance markets​ on Capitol Hill in Washington on Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper speaks at the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee during a hearing to discuses ways to stabilize health insurance markets​ on Capitol Hill in Washington on Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Wednesday, ideally, would have been the last day of the Gov. John Hickenlooper’s special session to fix a tax error written into a law he signed in May. Instead, he has some extra time on his hands.

At 9:30 a.m. Hickenlooper will join six other governors to formally announce a multi-state effort to set up charging stations for electric vehicles to improve their travel across the West. Colorado Politics told you about the early stages of the plan last December, when it included about 2,000 miles’ worth of juice.

The plan that’s expected to be unveiled at the National Governors Association Energy Innovation Summit Wednesday morning at the Hyatt Regency in the Denver Tech Center includes 5,000 miles.

Hickenlooper will make an opening address then lead an hour-long roundtable.

Wednesday evening he and Lt. Gov. Donna Lynne will hold a town hall meeting at the Commerce Civic Center.

The town hall is from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

“All topics are welcome as Colorado residents are encouraged to provide input, ask questions and offer suggestions on how to further improve the state,” the governor’s office said Tuesday evening..

Hickenlooper convened a special session Monday, but Senate Republicans killed two bills to restore the ability for special districts to get a share of marijuana tax revenue. They were inadvertently cut out of collecting a share when lawmakers passed the bipartisan Senate Bill 267 in May, a complicated bill that passed in the final days of the session.

A bill takes at least three days to clear all the required committee meetings and votes. To kill a bill can take as little as a day. Senate Republicans killed two bills, one from their own chamber Monday and a bill passed by the Democratic-led House on Tuesday.

Had things gone more smoothly for the governor, he might have had a busier calendar on Wednesday.

Joey Bunch

Joey Bunch

Joey Bunch is the senior political correspondent for Colorado Politics. He has a 31-year career in journalism, including the last 15 in Colorado. He was part of the Denver Post team that won the Pulitzer Prize in 2013 and is a two-time Pulitzer finalist. His resume includes covering high school sports, the environment, the casino industry and civil rights in the South, as well as a short stint at CNN.


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