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Denver Council President Albus Brooks’ cancer is back, will undergo surgery

Author: Adam McCoy - April 23, 2018 - Updated: April 23, 2018

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Denver City Council President Albus Brooks. (denvergov.org)

Last summer, we told you about Denver City Council President Albus Brooks celebrating one year cancer free.

He had won a battle with Chondrosarcoma, a rare form of cancer of the bone. He won a battle with a 15-pound malignant tumor in his back, after two surgeries lasting some 20 hours. And Brooks, who represents Denver’s District 9, had defied the odds, leaving the hospital several days early following surgery, returning to the helm at the Denver City Council after just four weeks of medical leave and even snowboarding after being told he would never be able to hit the slopes again.

Unfortunately, Brooks is preparing for another battle with cancer, announcing on social media earlier this week his cancer had returned. He’ll undergo surgery to remove a grape-size tumor the first week of May after doctors discovered it during a checkup, according to his post. Read Brooks’ full social media post below:

Nearly two years ago I was diagnosed with chondrosarcoma, a rare form of skeletal cancer. One year later my family and I celebrated a full year being cancer free. Today, I write to share some difficult news.

During a recent check up this month, doctors found another small tumor. In 2016 the tumor in my body was the size of a cantaloupe; this one is the size of a grape. My surgery to remove the tumor is scheduled for the first week of May, after which I will be recovering for two weeks at home.

I share this news with you the same week that I will be a guest speaker at CancerCon, a conference uniting young adult patients, survivors, caregivers and advocates. While this recent update certainly changes a few details in my life, it definitely does not change my message of hope and resilience.

My story is not defined by cancer, yet cancer has shown me the powerful beauty of human capacity.

Like the capacity of individual grit when forced to fight for your life. Cancer does not discriminate, and I’ve met countless people who have had to engage in this same capacity for resilience in their own fight. My strength comes from those that have suffered and survived, as well as those who have lost their lives.

More than anything else, I have witnessed the capacity my family has to love fully. Their capacity to bring me joy and peace knows no limits, and it is with them that I will find my greatest encouragement in coming months.

It is in that spirit that I ask for Denver to keep me in your prayers. But not just me – there are people in our community that are going through the same thing, but don’t have the public position or fancy title. Because of this, they are often more alone. Don’t forget about them.

Adam McCoy

Adam McCoy

Adam McCoy covers Denver-area politics for Colorado Politics.