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Colorado spending more on prison inmate health care, report finds

Author: John Ingold The Denver Post - October 21, 2017 - Updated: October 21, 2017

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Members of the Colorado House and Senate Judiciary committees questioned the more than $5000,000 cost the Colorado Department of Corrections spent to treat each of 32 inmates for Hepatitis C during a Jan. 17, 2017, meeting with the Joint Budget Committee. (Courtesy Creative Commons)Members of the Colorado House and Senate Judiciary committees questioned the more than $5000,000 cost the Colorado Department of Corrections spent to treat each of 32 inmates for Hepatitis C during a Jan. 17, 2017, meeting with the Joint Budget Committee. (Courtesy Creative Commons)

Colorado is spending more per inmate on health care as the state’s prison population ages, according to a national report released Wednesday.

The report, from the Pew Charitable Trusts, found that Colorado spent $6,641 per inmate on health care in the 2015 fiscal year. That placed the state in the middle of the pack nationally: 21st for the highest spending and about $900 per inmate more than the national median.

In the 2010 fiscal year, Colorado spent $5,807 per inmate on health care, meaning that per-inmate spending increased 14 percent over the five-year span.

The per-inmate tallies do not include health care costs for inmates in private prisons, where the Pew report says nearly 20 percent of the state’s inmates are housed. The figures also don’t include some health care costs of inmates in the custody of the Department of Corrections who were housed in local jails, according to the report.

Read more at denverpost.com

John Ingold The Denver Post


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