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Cary Kennedy unleashes ‘tweetstorm’ … on Colorado growth

Author: Jessica Machetta - December 24, 2017 - Updated: December 23, 2017

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KennedyCary Kennedy hugs a supporter at her campaign office in Denver. (Photo by Jessica Machetta, Colorado Politics)

Former state treasurer and Democratic candidate for governor Cary Kennedy held a 25-hour “tweetstorm” Thursday, one tweet per hour for every new person that moves into Colorado, 25 each day.

Also this week, Kennedy unveiled her goal of improving the state’s transportation challenges and expanding broadband in rural areas.

“Growth is a top concern,” Kennedy said on Twitter. “My #CKplanforgrowth tackles issues like housing, transportation & protecting the Colorado we love.”

“Colorado has gone too long without preparing for growth,” she said in a press release. “Our deteriorating roads and inadequate transit systems hold our state back and cost us time and money. Our state is innovative and forward looking, but we haven’t made the necessary investments. I know as a working mom how frustrating it is when you miss dinner with your family because you’re stuck in traffic. We can do better.”

Kennedy’s four-tiered plan includes making Colorado affordable; protecting public lands and open spaces; investing in transportation, housing, water conservation, clean renewable energy and broadband; and standing up for middle-class families.

“I’ve watched Colorado’s population double since I was a kid,” Kennedy told Colorado Politics. “And now, forecasters are telling us it’s going to double again by the time my teenagers are my age.”

The political reality, however, is that she will have to pay for such goals and possibly wrangle support from moderates and Republicans, depending on which party holds majorities in the state House and Senate next year. That dynamic quickly fills lofty campaign promises with hot air.

While serving as chief financial officer for Denver, Kennedy helped start the city’s first affordable housing initiative, a plan she would make statewide if elected.

“People can’t afford to live in the communities where they grew up, and can’t afford to live in the communities where they work, so that’s added to our traffic congestion problem,” she said.

Jessica Machetta