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Hal BidlackHal BidlackAugust 24, 20186min285

I pulled my first alert – as going out to an intercontinental ballistic missile site for a 24-hour tour is called – in the early Fall of 1981. A freshly minted second lieutenant in the United States Air Force, I had finished my “tech school” at Vandenburg Air Force Base in California a few weeks earlier. In that training environment, I was first exposed to the three big elements of being a missile launch officer: weapons system controls, codes, and EWO. Remember, the military loves funny names for things. In plain English, those terms mean the mechanics of operating and controlling the missile systems themselves, while “codes” has to do with how important information is secured within the system, and EWO stands for “emergency war orders,” or more simply put, the top-secret stuff having to do with going to war. Heady stuff to be sure.


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Kelly SloanKelly SloanAugust 24, 20186min313

The war over the efficacy of tax reductions, like taxes themselves, is perennial, the neo-Keynesian opponents of tax relief proving stubbornly resistant to evidence. Colorado was chosen as the location for launching the inaugural salvo in the latest campaign to demonstrate to the doubters that, yes, it’s really true: allowing people to keep more of their own money is a good thing.


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Simon LomaxSimon LomaxAugust 23, 201811min841

Investors: Don’t buy what political activists are trying to sell you in Colorado. I’m surprised this reminder is even necessary, given how anti-oil and gas ballot measures collapsed in 2014 and 2016. But according to the Denver Business Journal, this month’s signature submittal for anti-oil and gas Initiative 97 “rattled some investors,” with a $3 billion drop in the combined market value of some of Colorado’s largest energy companies observed in the days afterward.


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Hal BidlackHal BidlackAugust 21, 20186min308

“Water, water, everywhere, so let’s all have a drink!” Thus spoke the great political and social commentator Homer Simpson, when, a few seasons back, he found himself afloat in the middle of a salt-water ocean. As his thirst grew, he recalled what he thought was the lesson of being marooned at sea. Happily, as the Simpson’s is only a silly comedy show, it was all resolved in 28 minutes time, and all was well.


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Faith WinterFaith WinterAugust 21, 20186min493

The Clean Air Act of 1970 – which was signed into law by a Republican President, demonstrating that a commitment to our environment doesn’t have to be a partisan issue – allows states to either comply with federal vehicle emissions standards or to adopt one alternative set of standards. The last set of federal standards were adopted with support from auto-manufacturers in large part to align with the state standards, so that they would have one clear standard. President Trump’s proposed rollback of the federal standards would result in two standards once again, unless the federal government forces the states to adopt the federal standard – which would be a blatant intrusion on a right of the states that has been respected by Presidents of both parties for decades.