Education Archives - Colorado Politics
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Joey BunchJoey BunchFebruary 18, 20185min41
Thousands of additional Colorado families might be able to pay for child care if a federal spending bill due in March fulfills the pledge of a recently approved budget deal. That’s because the deal, passed by Congress and signed by President Trump earlier this month, promised new money for a subsidy program that helps low-income […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchFebruary 18, 20183min37
Rep. Dave Williams, R-Colorado Springs, brokered a compromise on a bill that would help desperate Colorado school districts to find teachers. If the legislation can do as well in the Senate, where it’s sponsored by Sen. Bob Gardner, R-Colorado Springs, school districts could grant a local license to an applicant who has taught three years […]

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Marianne GoodlandMarianne GoodlandFebruary 16, 20187min211
It’s not just about preventing another Columbine-style school shooting. Handheld radios in schools help employees manage difficult parents or help students get to school when the bus breaks down. But it’s the cost of setting up radio communications to first responders that is stopping many school districts from making that happen, and this week, Republican […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchFebruary 16, 20184min253
The Denver school board took a stand Thursday in support of young undocumented immigrants, urging Congress to save the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and pledging to provide opportunities for Denver educators to teach students about immigrant rights. “You have accomplices and luchadores in us,” said board member Angela Cobián. Cobián, who represents the […]

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Marianne GoodlandMarianne GoodlandFebruary 14, 201813min205
For those who believe strongly in the premise of local control of school districts by the people elected to run them, the idea that the Colorado State Board of Education can overrule local decisions on charter schools rankles. Case in point: Jefferson County. Last year, the local school board gave grudging approval to a charter […]

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Debbie Kelley, The GazetteDebbie Kelley, The GazetteFebruary 13, 20186min6251

A homegrown proposal that would allow Colorado's community colleges to give students who earn an associate's degree in nursing the chance to obtain an advanced bachelor's degree left the House floor Monday with "an enormous amount of momentum," said Rep. Paul Lundeen, a Republican from Monument who represents portions of El Paso County, where the proposal initiated.


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Kara MasonKara MasonFebruary 6, 20182min3111

The nation’s first pot scholarship program is making college possible for even more students in Pueblo this year; 600, to be exact.

Pueblo County commissioners announced Monday they would likely award more than 180 more awards to college-bound seniors in Pueblo than what was awarded last year. This year nearly $750,000 is available for scholarships. Last year, the county awarded $420,000 to students; county officials said that amount was just coincidentally similar to the 4/20 reference.

In recent years between 300 and 400 students graduate from Pueblo high schools. Every high school senior in the county is automatically eligible, but the scholarship that comes from the recreational marijuana revenue is only awarded to Pueblo high school graduates who plan to attend college at CSU-Pueblo or Pueblo Community College.

“Even if you’re not sure if you’re eligible, you should apply. We have $75,000 available for students who may not fall into the Pueblo County Scholarship’s defined criteria,” Pueblo Hispanic Education Foundation Executive Director Beverly Duran said in a statement.

Pueblo County voters decided in 2015 to allocate 50 percent of the marijuana excise tax collected in Pueblo County to the scholarship fund. The remainder of that money goes to a list of community projects, such as trails and parks.

As the excise tax grows the amount of money available for scholarships is expected to, too. And that could mean the difference in going to college for some Pueblo students.

“It is so critically important to make college affordable for our youth if we want to provide long-term economic opportunity to our community,” Pueblo County Commissioner Sal Pace said of the program last year. “Too many kids can’t afford to go to college, with this program we are taking cannabis-tax revenue and using it to provide for a brighter future in Pueblo.”