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Consumers in the city of Denver will soon get more help to stay protected against fraud. Thursday Mayor Michael Hancock announced a Consumer Financial Protection Initiative aimed at curbing predatory financial practices in the city. The initiative will focus on elder financial abuse, immigration fraud, wage theft, predatory lending and housing practices.


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Joey BunchJoey BunchMarch 15, 20185min163

A Colorado House committee, once again, killed legislation that would allow homeless people to linger where they want, which would have undermined or outlawed urban camping bans imposed by cities across the state. Police and municipal government officials again testified that allowing people to camp wherever they want doesn't connect them to shelter or mental health services or other help. Businesses and others alleged that loitering hurts trade and helps crime. And scores of homeless people and their advocates spoke of the indignities and choices they face trying to survive on the street. A place to sleep isn't too much to ask, they argued.


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Recent deregulation at the Consumer Protection Agency at the federal level has sparked concerns about how Coloradans will be protected. On Thursday, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock plans to lay out at least some of his local solutions. The mayor will take part in a forum called A Predatory Economy: Denver's Call to Action put on by the Bell Policy Center, a left-leaning, Denver-based economic think tank. The 3 p.m. event is in the former Denver Post building' auditorium at 101 W. Colfax in downtown Denver.


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Just two decades ago, the South Sheridan Commercial Corridor was a robust commercial center. Residents could catch a movie at the twin cinema, take their children for an afternoon at the skating rink or shop and dine at one of several retail establishments. Even with Denver’s booming economy, much of the 64-acre site off of South Sheridan Boulevard is a ghost town. The cinema, skating rink and nearly all of the retail has fled. The Target, once a retail anchor for the site, left for greener pastures in developing Belmar in Lakewood in 2011.



Vince BzdekVince BzdekFebruary 20, 20186min410

Colorado Springs has always prided itself on lower housing prices than other Front Range cities, but that has changed fast in the last couple years. As the city's housing market has gone white-hot, affordable housing has suddenly become scarce as playoff wins for the Broncos in the last two years, fueling the city's homeless problem and creating a price crisis for lower- and even middle-income residents.