September 21, 20171min292

A library card has always been a cheap passport to other worlds. But in the Information Age, when a vast repository of knowledge is just an internet connection away for the majority of Americans, how does a library remain relevant?



September 20, 20171min280

Republicans are mounting a last-ditch effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act before Sept. 30, after which the U.S. Senate will require more than a simple majority to pass any health-care reform bill.



September 19, 20172min297

In the wake of last fall’s failed bid to get voters to approve a sales tax hike for a $60 million event center complex, city officials faced the unsavory prospect of sinking millions into the aging Two Rivers Convention Center just to maintain its status as a money loser.



September 13, 20171min317

President Donald Trump has taken his lumps for dumping the fate of “Dreamers” back into the hands of Congress, but revoking the Obama-era government program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) may finally clean up a legitimate problem.

Even Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California said recently that DACA is “on shaky legal ground… That’s why we need to pass a law and we should do it.”

The Obama administration created DACA five years ago to give those youngsters who were brought to the United States illegally by their parents a temporary reprieve from deportation.

It was a stop-gap measure Obama implemented when Congress failed to enact a legislative solution, but hardliners criticized it as presidential overreach. Trump and Republicans called it unconstitutional.

Read more at The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel.



September 11, 20171min174

This weekend, Colorado politicians descended on Grand Junction en masse to pay homage to the Western Slope at Club 20’s fall conference.

Nearly every statewide candidate can be counted on coming to a Club 20 meeting before Election Day. It’s a small, simple way of saying, “I understand that Colorado’s challenges encompass more than the Front Range.”

They burnish their rural credentials by rubbing elbows with local leaders, trade wingtips and ties for boots and bolos, and address the issues they think resonate with Western Slope voters.

But our social complexities can’t be ascertained in a single, perfunctory visit. Who do candidates think we are? Hopefully not the small cross-section of people who shaped Peter Hessler’s thoughtful Grand Junction-based analysis, “How Trump is Transforming Rural America.”

Read more at The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel.



September 10, 20171min212

This weekend, Colorado politicians descended on Grand Junction en masse to pay homage to the Western Slope at Club 20’s fall conference.

Nearly every statewide candidate can be counted on coming to a Club 20 meeting before Election Day. It’s a small, simple way of saying, “I understand that Colorado’s challenges encompass more than the Front Range.”

They burnish their rural credentials by rubbing elbows with local leaders, trade wingtips and ties for boots and bolos, and address the issues they think resonate with Western Slope voters.

But our social complexities can’t be ascertained in a single, perfunctory visit. Who do candidates think we are? Hopefully not the small cross-section of people who shaped Peter Hessler’s thoughtful Grand Junction-based analysis, “How Trump is Transforming Rural America.”

Read more at The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel.



September 8, 20171min187

What’s the value of being disaster-proof?

It’s a question more likely to be explored as severe weather events become more common around the globe.

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have sparked discussions about the role climate change plays in the severity of storms.

As scientists have pointed out, climate change didn’t cause the hurricanes. But it did make them more cataclysmic.

Read more at The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel.



September 7, 20171min146

A confluence of money-robbing factors has diminished the Clifton Fire Protection District’s ability to cover the cost of providing basic services and prepare for future needs.

Making the case for a 2.25 mill increase is easy enough, but the special district is asking voters to say yes at a time when both the school district and the county are also floating ballot questions for more funding in November.

Clifton residents owe it to themselves to understand why the district would brave the odds to secure more funding in a crowded field and what happens if they don’t support the measure.

As one might expect, Clifton Fire has put forth a modest request. The increase would bring the mill rate to 11.552 mills. That’s an extra $1.30 a month on a home with a valuation of $175,000, or $16 a year added to a residential property tax bill.

Read more at The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel.