August 22, 20172min391

Joe Parker walked the Sheely neighborhood in central Fort Collins on July 20, answering questions about the under-construction stadium that loomed just to the north.

Barriers and bread were broken that day at a community block party that would have seemed impossible five years ago when Colorado State University decided to build a $220 million stadium in the heart of its nearby campus. Cordiality permeated the neighborhood as Parker, CSU’s athletics director, and other representatives of the university and the city of Fort Collins mingled with residents.

Sheely, the historic neighborhood one block south of the stadium, became ground zero of opposition to the project in 2012. Longtime residents already besieged by the issues of a growing city lamented the stadium as yet one more scourge to their quality of life.

They, and numerous others, aired their grievances in letters published in the Coloradoan, in open forum in front of the Fort Collins City Council, and, frequently, in front of CSU staff.

Read more at The Fort Collins Coloradoan.



August 20, 20171min230

Joe Parker walked the Sheely neighborhood in central Fort Collins on July 20, answering questions about the under-construction stadium that loomed just to the north.

Barriers and bread were broken that day at a community block party that would have seemed impossible five years ago when Colorado State University decided to build a $220 million stadium in the heart of its nearby campus. Cordiality permeated the neighborhood as Parker, CSU’s athletics director, and other representatives of the university and the city of Fort Collins mingled with residents.

Sheely, the historic neighborhood one block south of the stadium, became ground zero of opposition to the project in 2012. Longtime residents already besieged by the issues of a growing city lamented the stadium as yet one more scourge to their quality of life.

Read more at The Fort Collins Coloradoan.



August 14, 20171min200

A man waiting at a busy Fort Collins street corner is asking for money.

He knows that if he stands there long enough, someone will give it to him.

Fort Collins, though, doesn’t seem to know how to handle this situation.

Not just the city — which ran afoul of the American Civil Liberties Union with a 2015 crackdown on panhandling and ensuing efforts to blunt “disruptive behaviors” linked to the city’s homeless and transient population — but its residents and visitors, too.

Read more at The Fort Collins Coloradoan.



August 5, 20171min400

Do you want faster internet service for less money than you’re currently paying?

We do.

But as the city of Fort Collins gets serious about its push to build a high-speed internet utility that would rival anything already available in the city, the Coloradoan Editorial Board believes it’s time to think more critically on the issue.

To some residents, a fiber-optic network capable of delivering internet speeds of up to 1 gigabit per second sounds like an impressive asset for a city that prides itself on the pursuit of being world class.

To others, it sounds like government overreach into a rapidly evolving industry that would place the city in direct competition with cable TV and internet giant Comcast and other private-sector providers.

Read more at the Fort Collins Coloradoan



July 27, 20171min160

The white picket fence lining the southeast corner of Harmony and Taft Hill roads may offer the best crystal-ball view into Fort Collins’ housing future.

The Coloradoan editorial board peeked beyond that fence earlier this week, when Fort Collins Habitat for Humanity shared its vision for Harmony Cottages.

When complete, the new neighborhood will feature 48 new homes built on nearly 4½ acres, embracing “new urbanism” themes of shared common spaces, maximum housing density, energy efficiency and a location off a city bus line.

The homes — 44 duplexes and four modest single-family structures — are expected to fulfill the American dreams of 58 adults with 86 children. Families who qualify for the nonprofit’s housing assistance earn no more than 60 percent of the area’s median income, about $47,000 for a family of three.

Read more at The Fort Collins Coloradoan.



July 17, 20171min130

Imagine a space of community and serenity, where neighbors tend to colorful springtime bursts of nature while the sound of children’s delight over flapping butterfly wings fills the air.

This sacred space offers a reprieve from the haste of life and an opportunity to reconnect with the land, all within walking distance of the Colorado State University campus and only 2 miles from downtown Fort Collins.

That is the vision set forward more than three years ago for an expanded Gardens on Spring Creek. To date, more than $4.2 million has been raised for the $6 million phased expansion of Fort Collins’ botanical garden.

The names of donors to this project will feel familiar — Woodward, the Bohemian Foundation and the Community Foundation for Northern Colorado have all pitched in. The city of Fort Collins has supported the Gardens to the tune of $400,000 annually, with an additional $2 million pledged by taxpayers through the “BOB 2” tax passed in 2015.

Read more at The Fort Collins Coloradoan.