Steamboat TodayJune 1, 20171min1110

The opioid epidemic is real, and as the Steamboat Pilot & Today has reported and continues to report, it’s hit Steamboat Springs and Routt County hard. One overdose death is too many, and from 2014 to 2016, the rate of drug overdose deaths in Routt County increased six-fold, with more than 65 percent of those deaths attributed to the abuse of prescription opioids.

Thanks to the efforts of the Rx Task Force, a group of concerned community leaders who began meeting in late 2015 to work toward educating the public about the growing problem, the issue of prescription drug abuse in our area is not going unnoticed, nor will the problem go away without a fight.

That’s why we were encouraged when it was announced this month that Routt County and Yampa Valley Medical Center will be part of two different statewide initiatives aimed at fighting opioid abuse.

Read more at Steamboat Today.


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Steamboat TodayMay 31, 20171min690

Routt County rancher and county commissioner Doug Monger likes to keep a low profile when he’s not making decisions at the historic county courthouse.

But he said Tuesday he felt too strongly about the future of healthcare to pass up chance to step in front of a camera and speak out about the issue.

“I’ll be the first to tell you Obamacare’s not perfect,” Monger says in the intro to the advertisement from Healthier Colorado, which is aimed at Republican Sen. Cory Gardner. “But Donald Trump’s healthcare plan will make things even worse.”

18 during a snowstorm on a ranch in Parker.

Read more at Steamboat Today.



Steamboat TodayMay 30, 20171min370

We were pleased this week with the news that Colorado U.S. Sen. Corey Gardner and U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton had reached out to Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, asking him not to make any changes in the status of Canyons of the Ancients National Monument in far Southwestern Colorado. However, we’re also skeptical.

Canyons of the Ancients, in some ways a more remote, less-traveled adjunct to nearby Hovenweap National Monument, represents a treasure trove of archaeological sites, with startling numbers of sandstone ruins from an era when the Pueblo people were building cylindrical dwellings. Tipton accurately pointed out in the news release announcing the letter, that Canyons of the Ancients, with an estimated 6,355 cultural sites, is what Congress intended when it approved the Antiquities Act.

Presidents Bill Clinton, George Bush and Barack Obama have used the act to create new national monuments.

Read more at Steamboat Today.



Steamboat TodayMay 25, 20171min370

Steamboat Springs High School students and staff celebrated their differences and their similarities during the school’s first-every Diversity Week May 15 to 19. The observance was kicked off with a school-wide assembly featuring a presentation by Schuyler Bailar, the first openly transgender athlete to compete on a Division 1 men’s college sports team.

The Harvard swimmer spoke about his journey and his struggle to “fit in,” and based on the response from students, which was demonstrated during the question-and-answer time after his speech, the young man’s words resonated with them.

We are proud of our local school district for being courageous in bringing a topic like this into the mainstream conversation and for supporting a student-led effort to educate people about different races, religions, genders and cultures.

Read more at Steamboat Today.



Steamboat TodayMay 24, 20171min440

Steamboat Springs High School students and staff celebrated their differences and their similarities during the school’s first-ever Diversity Week May 15 to 19. The observance was kicked off with a school-wide assembly featuring a presentation by Schuyler Bailar, the first openly transgender athlete to compete on a Division 1 men’s college sports team.

The Harvard swimmer spoke about his journey and his struggle to “fit in,” and based on the response from students, which was demonstrated during the question-and-answer time after his speech, the young man’s words resonated with them.

We are proud of our local school district for being courageous in bringing a topic like this into the mainstream conversation and for supporting a student-led effort to educate people about different races, religions, genders and cultures.

Read more at Steamboat Today.



Steamboat TodayMay 20, 20172min390

A week ago, administrators at Steamboat Springs Middle School may have averted a tragedy.

On May 7, school officials were notified that one of their students had “threatened harm and actions that may or may not have included harm to others,” according to a letter sent to parents by the district the following Monday, May 8.

Within moments of receiving the information, deputies with the Routt County Sheriff’s Office, who had also been notified, began investigating the alleged threat and, by Sunday evening, had taken the juvenile in question into protective custody to be evaluated by medical professionals at Mind Springs Health.

This was a positive ending to a story that might easily have played out in a very different way, and in thinking about it, we can’t help but wonder how much of the needless pain and anguish associated with schoolyard massacres and teen suicide might have been avoided had someone come forward and voiced a concern.

Read more at Steamboat Today



Steamboat TodayMay 17, 20172min441

After more than a year of studying the needs of the Steamboat Springs School District in the wake of a failed bond issue, the Community Committee for Education — CC4E — presented its formal recommendations to the school board last week.

The volunteer group has asked the school district to consider pursuing a $31 million bond to cover millions of dollars in deferred maintenance on existing school buildings, plus several new construction items that include adding onto to the Steamboat Springs High School, building a gym for Strawberry Park Elementary School and updating the high school’s turf and track.

The recommendation made by CC4E came as a bit of a surprise to us. We had expected the group to advocate for building a new elementary school at the district-owned Whistler site and suggesting a reconfiguration of grade levels at the Strawberry Park campus, but in light of a number of mitigating factors that have surfaced in recent months, we think the group’s recommendation makes good sense.

Read more at Steamboat Today.



Steamboat TodayMay 15, 20172min440

A week ago, administrators at Steamboat Springs Middle School may have averted a tragedy.

On May 7, school officials were notified that one of their students had “threatened harm and actions that may or may not have included harm to others,” according to a letter sent to parents by the district the following Monday, May 8.

Within moments of receiving the information, deputies with the Routt County Sheriff’s Office, who had also been notified, began investigating the alleged threat and, by Sunday evening, had taken the juvenile in question into protective custody to be evaluated by medical professionals at Mind Springs Health.

This was a positive ending to a story that might easily have played out in a very different way, and in thinking about it, we can’t help but wonder how much of the needless pain and anguish associated with schoolyard massacres and teen suicide might have been avoided had someone come forward and voiced a concern.

Read more at Steamboat Today.



Steamboat TodayMay 7, 20171min350

According to traffic safety statistics released by the Colorado State Patrol, as of March 31, troopers had investigated 114 crashes that involved fatalities or injuries specifically linked to driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, a 6.5-percent increase over 2016 numbers for the same time period.

Think about that for a moment: 114 fatal or injurious DUI crashes in the first three months of 2017 alone.

This only one among myriad heartbreaking statistics that reinforce something most of us already knew: Driving under the influence is a problem across the state of Colorado, and, indeed, across the entire nation.

Read more at Steamboat Today.



Steamboat TodayMay 4, 20171min360

It’s said that Nero fiddled while Rome burned.

Today, that old saw might aptly be repurposed to read, GOP lawmakers fiddle while Colorado’s roads crumble.

We refer, of course, to the unceremonious demise last week of House Bill 17-1242, which would have asked voters to approve or reject a plan to raise billions of dollars in transportation funds through the next 20 years by way of a .5 percent increase in the state’s sales tax.

The bipartisan bill was sponsored by Republican Senate President Kevin Grantham and Democratic House Speaker Crisanta Duran, joined by Republican State Sen. Randy Baumgardner and Democratic State Rep. Diane Mitsch Bush, the latter of whom chair the transportation committees in their respective chambers.

Read more at Steamboat Today.