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Rachael WrightRachael WrightApril 27, 201712min348

Twenty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … In a continuation of the battle for welfare reform, Gov. Roy Romer outlined his reason for vetoing House Bill 97-1166. “I am vetoing this bill because of one provision. That provision creates an irrational two-tiered system of welfare cash assistance benefits for our fellow citizens in Colorado who fall on hard times and need some short-term help to get back on their feet. That provision would allow for so-called ‘pilot-projects’ that would permit counties to be exempted from providing a minimum cash benefit to families.”


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightApril 13, 201711min281

Twenty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … When she was elected in 1994, Secretary of State Vikki Buckley became the first African-American woman to be elected in statewide office in Colorado. She spent 22 years working her way up through the ranks of the secretary of state’s office, and eventually became second in command of the elections division.


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightApril 6, 201711min306

Thirty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … Colorado U.S. Sen. Gary Hart officially announced his second run for U.S. president on his home turf at Red Rocks Amphitheater, saying, among other remarks, “I guarantee you that I’ll make some mistakes.” At a press conference the next Tuesday, in Denver City Council chambers, he said that he had referred to campaign tactical issues, not mistakes on issues. He told reporters that he would be better prepared for victory — or defeat in 1988.


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightMarch 30, 201713min304

… Thirty Years Ago This Week in The Colorado Statesman … Daniel Schorr, a nationally known CBS and cable newsman, spoke to several hundred attendees on March 27 at the B.H.M. Synagogue in Denver during a speech entitled “A Jew In Journalism.” During the talk, Schorr honed in on the timely news of Jonathan Pollard and the surrounding controversy regarding his alleged leaking of state secrets. Pollard "is what you get when you go off the rails,” Schorr said.


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightMarch 23, 201711min255

Thirty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … Arapahoe County and the City of Aurora were witnessing a dramatic increase in trash production within their jurisdictions, generated by their accumulating residents thanks to the large population boom. Meanwhile, land developers were seeking to eliminate the biggest resource for trash disposal, the Denver-Arapahoe disposal site at the Lowry Landfill, to make way for further development — and they set their sights on lobbying the Colorado Department of Health — heavily. Sounds like a clash waiting to happen, right?


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightMarch 9, 201711min14

… Thirty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … According to Don Barbarick, state meteorologist with the Colorado Department of Health’s air pollution division, the Town of Parker was a relative “fail-safe area” for Denver’s “brown cloud," the notorious billow of air pollution that settled across Denver's skyline. Parker was deemed safe because of its elevation, the general direction of winds, and because the brown cloud tended to veer towards the foothills west of Parker, according to experts. “It’s an entire metro-area problem,” said Charles Stevens, a physical scientist with the Environmental Protection Agency. “It’s not just Denver. You guys say, ‘I’ll move out and get away from it’ and pretty soon there are 10,000, 20,000, 30,000 people who move out to the same area and then you’ve got your own brown cloud.”


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightMarch 2, 201715min354

…Twenty Years Ago This Week in The Colorado Statesman … The Colorado General Assembly seemed to have lawmakers' heads stuck in the corporate law section of the Colorado Revised Statutes. At the start of the 1997 legislative session, the Colorado Bar Association pushed two measures in the Legislature that would have far reaching impact in corporate law, and would likely help corporate lawyers make a little extra cash too. One bill revised the Nonprofit Corporation Act and another changed Colorado’s partnership law, while still another helped define the role of partners in a business entity should creditors come knocking.


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightFebruary 16, 201711min296

… Twenty Years Ago This Week in The Colorado Statesman … An El Paso County Republican saga continued with self-proclaimed “true conservatives” toppling the “old guard,” seizing the reins of El Paso's Grand Old Party. After staking their campaigns on pro-life and Christian values, they went on to capture the top three party offices and 20 bonus member slots to the state GOP Central Committee. Many contended the social conservative sweep down south marked the end of the “big tent” era when party leadership preached tolerance for those with differing social views, particularly on the topic of abortion. The winners? Colorado Springs attorney Wayne Williams was elected chairman of the El Paso County Republican Party, Focus on the Family executive Tom Minnery won vice chairman and Leigh Ann Rauch was chosen secretary. All three were given a stamp of approval by a coalition of “true conservative” Republicans.