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Consumers in the city of Denver will soon get more help to stay protected against fraud. Thursday Mayor Michael Hancock announced a Consumer Financial Protection Initiative aimed at curbing predatory financial practices in the city. The initiative will focus on elder financial abuse, immigration fraud, wage theft, predatory lending and housing practices.


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Recent deregulation at the Consumer Protection Agency at the federal level has sparked concerns about how Coloradans will be protected. On Thursday, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock plans to lay out at least some of his local solutions. The mayor will take part in a forum called A Predatory Economy: Denver's Call to Action put on by the Bell Policy Center, a left-leaning, Denver-based economic think tank. The 3 p.m. event is in the former Denver Post building' auditorium at 101 W. Colfax in downtown Denver.


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Just two decades ago, the South Sheridan Commercial Corridor was a robust commercial center. Residents could catch a movie at the twin cinema, take their children for an afternoon at the skating rink or shop and dine at one of several retail establishments. Even with Denver’s booming economy, much of the 64-acre site off of South Sheridan Boulevard is a ghost town. The cinema, skating rink and nearly all of the retail has fled. The Target, once a retail anchor for the site, left for greener pastures in developing Belmar in Lakewood in 2011.


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Wildfire footage captured from drones can be breathtaking, but getting that footage can often hinder firefighters in their rescue efforts. Currently emergency responders can only ask the public to keep their drones away, however, there are no local penalties. But a new law may change that. Legislation is set to be introduced at the Capitol […]

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Parking is the second-largest revenue driver for Denver International Airport, but according to City Auditor Timothy O’Brien, lax oversight with Lyft and Uber could be letting money slip through the cracks. In a report released Thursday, O’Brien found the airport charges Lyft and Uber $2.60 for each pickup and drop off at DIA. But the […]

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