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Julie PaceJulie PaceFebruary 28, 20175min341

Heralding a "new chapter of American greatness," President Donald Trump stood before Congress for the first time Tuesday night and issued a broad call for overhauling the nation's health care system, significantly boosting military spending and plunging $1 trillion into upgrading crumbling infrastructure. Striking an optimistic tone, Trump declared: "The time for small thinking is over."


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Julie PaceJulie PaceJanuary 31, 20178min352

President Donald Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch, a fast-rising conservative judge with a writer's flair, to the Supreme Court on Tuesday, a selection expected to spark a fierce fight with Democrats over a jurist who could shape America's legal landscape for decades to come. At 49, Gorsuch is the youngest Supreme Court nominee in a quarter century. He's distinguished himself on the Denver-based 10th Circuit Court of Appeals with his clear, colloquial writing, advocacy for court review of government regulations, defense of religious freedom and skepticism toward law enforcement. "Judge Gorsuch has outstanding legal skills, a brilliant mind, tremendous discipline and has earned bipartisan support," Trump said, announcing the nomination in his first televised address from the White House.


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Julie PaceJulie PaceJanuary 20, 201713min378

Pledging to empower America's "forgotten men and women," Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States Friday, taking command of a deeply divided nation and ushering in an unpredictable era in Washington. His victory gives Republicans control of the White House for the first time in eight years. Looking out over the crowd sprawled across the National Mall, Trump painted a bleak picture of the nation he now leads, lamenting crime, shuttered factories and depleted American leadership. He vowed to stir "new national pride," bring jobs back to the United States, and "eradicate completely" Islamic terrorism.


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Julie PaceJulie PaceDecember 4, 20167min697

President-elect Donald Trump, still mulling key Cabinet positions, attended a lavish costume party Saturday night hosted by some of his most influential donors at their palatial Long Island mansion. Trump, who did not sport a costume, reveled with guests at the Mercer family estate for the annual Christmas party; this year's theme was "Villains and Heroes." When asked what costume he was wearing, Trump — who was sporting his usual dark suit — simply pointed at himself and mouthed "me."


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Julie PaceJulie PaceNovember 12, 20168min351

Donald Trump may take a victory tour to states that elected him president, an aide said Saturday, as boisterous protests unfolded outside the tower where he holed up with members of his transition team and fielded calls congratulating him. While he's announced one decision — putting Vice President-elect Mike Pence in charge of the transition instead of Chris Christie — Trump must identify other people for top White House jobs and Cabinet posts. The president-elect remained out of sight at Trump Tower, with streets outside swarming with thousands objecting to the results of Election Day. At one point, documentary filmmaker Michael Moore, a liberal critic of Trump who nevertheless had predicted his victory, entered the tower lobby with a camera crew in tow and asked to see Trump. "I just thought I'd see if I could get into Trump Tower and ride the famous escalator," said Moore, who did just that until he reached the fourth floor and the Secret Service told him he could go no higher.


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Julie PaceJulie PaceOctober 5, 20168min293

Republican Mike Pence won bipartisan plaudits for a calm and collected performance in the vice presidential debate. But Democrat Tim Kaine was claiming mission accomplished for forcing his opponent to confront —or not — Donald Trump's long list of provocative remarks. Pressed by Kaine to defend his running mate throughout the 90-minute debate Tuesday, Pence mostly dodged, sidestepped or let the moment pass by. He vouched for the billionaire's tax history, but was less vocal when challenged about Trump's temperament or his inflammatory words about women and President Barack Obama. "I can't imagine how Gov. Pence can defend the insult-driven, me-first style of Donald Trump," said Kaine, the Virginia senator and Hillary Clinton's No. 2.


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Julie PaceJulie PaceSeptember 26, 201612min318

In a combative opening debate, Hillary Clinton emphatically denounced Donald Trump Monday night for keeping his personal tax returns and business dealings secret from voters and peddling a "racist lie" about President Barack Obama. Businessman Trump repeatedly cast Clinton as a "typical politician" as he sought to capitalize on Americans' frustration with Washington.


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Julie PaceJulie PaceSeptember 24, 20168min264

Donald Trump needs to prove to voters that he has the policy depth and gravitas to serve as commander in chief. Hillary Clinton needs a moment to connect with Americans who question whether she can be trusted. In an election year that has upended political convention, the candidates' best opportunity to conquer their weaknesses will come in the most traditional of campaign forums: Monday's 90-minute, prime-time debate. Both campaigns expect a record-setting television audience for the high-stakes showdown, which could help tip the balance in a tight White House race.