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David O. WilliamsDavid O. WilliamsNovember 5, 20179min510
Former Obama field organizer and state legislative policy analyst Dylan Roberts wasn’t planning to jump back into politics after he got his law degree from the University of Colorado and landed a job as a deputy district attorney in Eagle County. Then Trump happened. “I was going to take a break from politics for a […]

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David O. WilliamsDavid O. WilliamsOctober 18, 201711min609
When Eagle County Public Health and Environment director Chris Lindley moved up to the Vail Valley from Denver a few months ago, he was stunned to learn his new home doesn’t have a single bed for people dealing with mental health or substance abuse issues. “Being new to the county and coming up here from […]

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David O. WilliamsDavid O. WilliamsSeptember 6, 201712min212
Eagle County Commissioner Jill Ryan spent more than a decade working for the Colorado Department of Public Health before entering politics, but the job change hasn’t meant much of subject change as she continues to focus intensely on runaway healthcare and insurance costs in the mountain-resort communities she represents. “People on the individual market have […]

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David O. WilliamsDavid O. WilliamsAugust 30, 20179min109
Colorado Republican Sen. Cory Gardner on Thursday told the Rocky Mountain Post that cybersecurity is a largely underreported topic in the state despite its potential to make Colorado a national and even international leader in one of the fastest growing tech sectors. “The issue of cybersecurity doesn’t always receive the attention it deserves, but is […]

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David O. WilliamsDavid O. WilliamsDecember 30, 201615min79

Despite a growing list of climate change doubters and fossil fuel industry supporters and executives comprising the list of Trump administration cabinet nominees, Democratic Colorado lawmakers and environmentalists are hopeful the state’s clean energy economy and outdoor recreation industry can continue to thrive. Mostly, though, there’s a growing sense of dread from the conservation community as President-elect Donald Trump picks people like Republican Montana U.S. Rep. Ryan Zinke for the post of Interior Secretary, former Republican Texas Gov. Rick Perry for Energy Secretary and ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson for Secretary of State. Oil and gas industry representatives, meanwhile, are eagerly looking forward to Trump’s inauguration Jan. 20. About a third of Colorado is owned by the federal government and managed by the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service. Coal mining and oil and gas companies have for the past eight years of the Obama administration lamented environmental regulations perceived as hurdles to energy production on public lands.


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David O. WilliamsDavid O. WilliamsDecember 22, 201612min101

Colleges and universities across Colorado are grappling with whether the incoming Trump administration will strip away federal deportation protections for undocumented students, most of whom came to the state at a very young age and pay in-state tuition under Colorado law. DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, was signed as an executive action by President Barack Obama in 2012. The policy provides deportation protection and work visas for law-abiding, undocumented students who came here as children and fit certain age criteria. Trump vowed on the campaign trail to reverse Obama’s executive actions, including DACA, but has since hinted he may “work something out” for undocumented college students whose parents brought them to the United States at a very young age.


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David O. WilliamsDavid O. WilliamsOctober 17, 201615min106

U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton, showing clear signs his race for CD3 has tightened in recent weeks, continues to aggressively call out former state Sen. Gail Schwartz for her comments and ads accusing Tipton of seeking to sell off federally owned public lands. Schwartz charges Tipton has sold out to coal mining and oil and gas companies and wants to transfer public lands to state or private ownership in order to increase domestic fossil fuel production. Schwartz, a Crested Butte Democrat who previously worked in ski-area design, favors preserving public lands to boost the outdoor recreation industry. “If we’re talking about outdoor recreation and protecting those public lands, let’s look at the Hermosa Creek bill that I had signed into law, that we were able to pass through a Republican-controlled Congress to be able to create those opportunities down in La Plata County,” Tipton said on a press call last month.


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David O. WilliamsDavid O. WilliamsSeptember 27, 201613min81

While Colorado state Senate District 8 has seen some very nasty political attacks in recent years — sometimes even bitter, red-on-red Republican infighting in this mostly conservative rural region — nothing gets people more riled up in these parts than transportation funding shortfalls. Voters who have been stuck for six hours on Interstate 70 when a car with bald tires starts a chain-reaction pileup in a snowstorm will turn a bright shade of red telling you about it, even if they’re the bluest of blue Democrats. And after all, former Mayor Bill McNichols was ousted in the early 80s in part because he failed to clear a massive blizzard from the streets of Denver.