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Alan FramAlan FramFebruary 20, 20177min250

Top House Republicans say their outline for replacing President Barack Obama's health care law is a pathway to greater flexibility and lower costs for consumers. Democrats see a road to ruin for millions who'd face lost coverage and higher medical expenses, particularly the poor. The plan "ensures more choices, lower costs and greater control over your health care," according to talking points GOP leaders handed lawmakers heading home to face constituents during this week's recess.


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Alan FramAlan FramJanuary 4, 20177min376

Donald Trump warned congressional Republicans on Wednesday against letting Democrats dodge blame for problems with President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, even as the GOP-led Congress takes initial steps toward dismantling the law. "Massive increases of ObamaCare will take place this year and Dems are to blame for the mess," the president-elect said in three tweets, using the statute's nickname. "It will fall of its own weight — be careful!"


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Alan FramAlan FramNovember 21, 20169min304

Here's the idea: Swiftly pass a repeal of President Barack Obama's health care law, perhaps soon enough for Donald Trump to sign it the day he takes the presidential oath. Then approve legislation restructuring the nation's huge and convoluted health care system — despite Republican divisions, Democratic opposition and millions of jittery constituents. What could go wrong? With Republicans controlling the White House and Congress in January, they're faced with delivering on their long-time promise to repeal and replace "Obamacare." Here are hurdles they'll face:


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Alan FramAlan FramSeptember 21, 20168min253

IRS Commissioner John Koskinen expressed regret to Congress Wednesday for his agency's past mistreatment of tea party groups, but said he has cooperated with congressional investigators and does not deserve to be impeached. The IRS chief made the remarks at a House Judiciary Committee hearing during a continued push by some conservatives to oust Koskinen. Their impeachment resolution accuses him of lying to lawmakers, ignoring subpoenas and overseeing an agency that destroyed emails as Congress investigated how the IRS subjected tea party groups seeking tax exemptions to harsh investigations years ago.