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Women’s March on Denver expects turnout of 30k+

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If you’re downtown on Saturday, it will be hard to miss: tens of thousands of people are expected to turn out for the “Women’s March on Denver,” which starts at 9 a.m. at Civic Center Park.

Jessica Rogers is one of three Denver women organizing the event. A contract librarian and book conservator by day, Rogers is no “professional activist,” but now she’s ready to host a crowd expected to top 30,000 people.

It all started a week after the election. Rogers and two other women — Cheetah McClellan and Karen Hinkel — launched their own online calls for an event in Colorado to coincide with the national Women’s March on Washington, D.C. The Denver women quickly learned of each other’s efforts and joined forces.

“Initially, we thought we’d attract 10-thousand people,” says Rogers. “But the numbers keep growing, and we’re working on the logistics — we need to get more toilets!”

Many of the hundreds of marches planned for Saturday have published their own mission statements, and the Denver one makes its priorities clear. In the Mile High City, the march is an appeal to “the nation and the administration-elect” to maintain values that many Americans fear could be in jeopardy: freedom of choice regarding biological and reproductive health, and equality for all regardless of religion, ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation.

After the march, a rally in Civic Center park will host dozens of speakers and performers, ranging from legislators (including state Sen. Irene Aquilar  and state Rep. Leslie Herod)  to stars from the Colorado arts scene (including Suzi Q. Smith  and Lucy Roucis).

Angela Astle, who runs a Denver collective of female performers, is coordinating the line-up. “I’m really impressed with the diverse group of people from walks of life that are speaking and performing,” she says.

Full information about the march can be found at the event website.

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