Advertisement
Border Patrol agents take a family into custody for illegally entering the United States at Roma, Texas. (iStock photo/Vichinterlang)
string(5) "10141"
NULL

Poll: Coloradans not so agitated over immigration after all?

Blog, Immigration, Uncategorized Comments Off 224

Much already has been reported about the latest Magellan Strategies poll released this week on Colorado’s political mood. The most noteworthy findings: The state’s voters prefer electing Democrats to Congress and disapprove of President Trump. Those leanings are more pronounced among the fully one third of the state’s voters who are registered unaffiliated. Interesting and perhaps troubling for Republicans.

Here’s a less prominent finding worth pondering: For all the ink we in the news media have devoted to both sides of the perennially superheated debate over illegal immigration, the Magellan survey found the issue was way down the list of Colorado voters’ most pressing concerns.

Among survey respondents overall, only 7.2 percent thought illegal immigration should be the top priority for Congress and the president to address. “Create good jobs/grow economy,” “funding transportation infrastructure,” “reduce government spending/national debt,” “National security/fighting terrorism,” “repeal/replace Obamacare,” and “tax reform” all polled higher. Immigration was in fact at the bottom of the list of specific issues submitted to the survey respondents.

Illegal immigration polled highest among Republican women, with almost 18 percent saying it should be the top priority in Washington, and it not surprisingly did better among Republicans in general — around 12 percent — than among Democrats at 3.1 percent.

Perhaps more telling was that among voters of all political persuasions and both sexes, only 3.4 percent of 18-to-34-year-olds and a mere 2.1 percent of 35-to-44-year-olds thought illegal immigration should be the top priority.

Could Colorado’s historically low unemployment rate be a factor in their outlook? If virtually no one is out of work, arguably, no one is worried about “losing jobs” to immigrants.

The survey of 502 likely Colorado voters in the 2018 general election was conducted by land line and cell phone April 26-27 and had a 4.38 percent margin of error.

 

Search

Advertisement

Back to Top