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La Junta Tribune-Democrat editorial: A criminal conviction shouldn’t have a lifetime of consequences

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There is an often repeated maxim in the American criminal justice system relating to punishment, “He paid his debt to society.” That maxim is obsolete. Why? A man or woman who has been convicted of a crime carries that debt forever — figuratively and, in many instances, literally.

In Pennsylvania, the bipartisan “Clean Slate” bill would automatically seal the record of an offender after staying crime-free for 10 years with the intent of making it easier for people convicted of nonviolent misdemeanors to find jobs and housing. The bill is the first of its kind in the nation, reported the Buck County Courier-Times.

While the bill is admirable it does not go far enough. To make a real impact on recidivism, a bill in Pennsylvania, or any other state, must include all criminal offenses, not just nonviolent offenses.

In 2009, Alfred Blumstein and Kiminori Nakamura of Carnegie Mellon University wrote in “Redemption in the Presence of Widespread Criminal Background Checks,” that there comes a time after a period of crime-free behavior that an ex-offender is no more likely to commit a crime than the general population.

Read more at the La Junta Tribune-Democrat

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